Color inspiration: Vintage pansies

Found this old greeting card at an antique store and really enjoyed the CMYK printing. Super inspired by the way the colors blended, and the overall noise pattern in the background is a really nice touch.

Have a very surreal Christmas!

I came across this painting by Yves Tenguy titled L’Orage (Paysage noir) which looks to me like an homage to Christmas, replete with a red Christmas tree and the spirits of Christmas floating about! This is totally my kind of party ;)

Yves Tanguy - 'The Storm'

Joey Yu energizes the everyday moments of life

London based illustrator Joey Yu caught my eye the other day because of her loose and expressive art style, with an uncanny knack for colors, which help brings her compositions to life. Her work demands your attention, as her expressive line work captures the energy of life, rather than a one-for-one recreation of a moment.

Joey Yu

Joey Yu

Joey Yu

Joey Yu

Ban Ban Bar & Chicken branding and graphics by Peculiar Familia

Ban Ban Bar & Chicken branding by Peculiar Familia

Instagram has introduced me to a lot of interesting, new designers and one recent favorite is Peculiar Familia. Headed up by Carlo Jensen, the Australian designer recently launched a new project in the form of Ban Ban Bar & Chicken, a new restaurant in Adelaide serving cold beer and Korean fried chicken. Peculiar Familia was responsible for the branding and graphics, and the eateries playful identity revolves “around a custom pixel font designed to echo the tile interior.”

Totally in love with the italic pixel font, it’s a sheer pleasure to look at. I’m still a fan of an Yves Klein blue, you can’t go wrong there, and the illustrations everywhere are super charming. It’ll be great to see how this identity continues to evolve. And I really want one of the shirts below because that’s me! I’m always hungry!

Ban Ban Bar & Chicken branding by Peculiar Familia

Ban Ban Bar & Chicken branding by Peculiar Familia

Ban Ban Bar & Chicken branding by Peculiar Familia

Studio Brasch introduces “Digibana”

Ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement, has been around since the 7th century and is taught in over 1,000 different types of schools of throughout the world today. In recent years, the art form has started to be reconsidered, though the primary theories of shape, line, and form still ring true. So what would ikebana be if you removed plants entirely, relying on the limits of computers instead?

Studio Brasch introduces Digibana

Studio Brasch, led by Anders Brasch-Willumsen, has been posting some interesting pieces on their Instagram called “Digibana,” which are described as a “futuristic ikebana practice where moments of beauty are created and preserved only by a constant stream of likes and shares.”

I find this project so interesting because the very nature of ikebana is nature. If ikebana is informed by modern and emphasizes a connection to nature, can that nature truly be represented digitally? I do like that Brasch-Willumsen’s explorations range the gamut from realistic to synthetic, crafting these delicate objects which are beautifully unnatural.

You can see more images on the Studio Brasch Instagram.

Studio Brasch introduces Digibana

Studio Brasch introduces Digibana

Music to buy: Studio Barnhus Volym 1

At the end of every Decmeber, Kyle and I make a list of attainable goals for the upcoming year that we feel will make our lives, or the lives of others, better. One goal I’m focusing on is buying the music I love.

In an age of streaming, with endless amounts of music, algorithmically generated playlists, and “What’s New” prioritized over what’s good, it feels like it’s hard to have a meaningful listening experience. Those factors, plus the fact that I listen to mostly independent or smaller artists who definitely can’t survive on the measly paychecks streaming royalties pay out. So I’m reverting back to the time of buying cassettes or CDs, which probably should have never gone away in the first place.

Studio Barnhus Volym 1

The first album I wanted to recommend purchasing is from Studio Barnhus, a DJ trio, a label, a studio on Barnhusgatan (“Orphanage street”) in Stockholm. The label is the brainchild of musicians Axel Boman, Petter Nordkvist and Kornél Kovács, all great electronic artists in their own right, who support other great musicians.

This is a fantastic compilation filled with an eclectic mix of artists raging from poppy techno, soul jams, and late night grooves. There are few tracks I’d call out specifically: The first is Sofia Kourtesis’ smooth house number ‘WinWin San,’ which sounds like driving through countryside with all windows down in the spring. DJ Koze makes an appearance on ‘Hawaiian Soldier,’ a smattering of stuttering, trippy samples which makes you feel like you’ve had too many daiquiris on the beach. Finally there’s the Piano Version of Axel Boman’s ‘Forgot About You,’ a dreamy tune that feels like it could be an old classic.

You can purchase the album through Bandcamp by clicking here.

Casa Bosques melds chocolate with design, creating delicious results

For the past six months I’ve been working out how I can combine my love of design with my passion for food. I started a pop-up brasserie called Le Filou with my buddy Nate Isreal, which was fun and successful, and makes me want try more ambitious efforts. Then I see inspiring works like Casa Bosques, a chocolate project from Savvy Studio, which makes me really want do make some left-field works.

The guiding concept behind Casa Bosques is to bring each project to its maximum capacity and expression. This is why Each CBB project is carefully manufactured using high quality raw materials. Collaborators are thoughtfully selected; Casa Bosques looks for experts that are passionate about their specialties, and also feel motivated by the constant search for perfection. Casa Bosques Chocolates is our first project in the entity, a collaboration with the master chocolatier Jorge Llanderal. Twelve different editions will be produced, one every season.

Casa Bosques Chocolate

The packaging design is exquisitely minimal, with playfully laid type set in a sans and monospace variety. I love the square image as the containing device for information, which is used again as a full-bleed print on the inside of the packaging. It imparts a touch of personality and a hint of context to what the flavor of the chocolate is.

Casa Bosques Chocolate and Apartmento collaboration

These fun details extend even further with the collaborations they’ve done, such as the one above with lifestyle magazine apartamento. The bar was made in honor of the magazine’s 10 year anniversary, and in true apartamento form, features a photo of a toilet taken by Katarina Šoški?. On the inside is the trademark pattern that adorns the side of the magazine which really makes this feel like a perfect, honest collaboration.

Speaking to the flavors, they’ve picked some really unique takes like Shiitake Mushroom and Puffed Quinoa, or the Pink Peppercorn which I’ve bought. Pink pepper has a delightfully mild, slightly floral flavor to it, and paired with the dark chocolate, makes for a winning combination.

You can splurge on a few bars for yourself by clicking here.

Hello again.

“A man is a very small thing, and the night is very large and full of wonders.” — Lord Dunsany

Trying this again, but with all previous expectations wiped away. I know now more than ever how important it is too have a place of my own. Where I’m not prey to algorithms and the fanciful ideas of low EQ developers and Silicon Valley fuccbois. Maybe people will read this again, maybe not, but here I am again, doing what I do. Time for a personal renaissance.