Category Art

Dana Tanamachi’s creates stunning nature-inspired pieces for Instagram headquarters

Dana Tanamachi's creates stunning nature-inspired pieces for Instagram headquarters

When I think of the most talented people in lettering my list includes Louise Fili, Jessica Hische, Erik Marinovich, Gemma O’Brien, and of course the incredible Dana Tanamachi. It’s been a joy to watch her work grow and evolve on Instagram as she handles immense murals, covers for books and magazines, and so much more. Very recently she completed a stunning triptych for the Instagram HQ which speaks to the growth of the platform over the years.

“This triptych was created by hand-cutting adhesive stencils, meticulously placing them on the birch boards, then painting a gradient on top of everything, and finally peeling off the stencils to reveal the beautiful woodgrain below.”


Dana Tanamachi's creates stunning nature-inspired pieces for Instagram headquarters

This first design illustrates IG’s infancy—strengthening/connecting roots, giving voices, and cultivating simplicity. The flowers shown here are a mix of the earliest spring flowers and oak leaves/acorns. The latter of which are tiny things that have the potential to create entire forests.


Dana Tanamachi's creates stunning nature-inspired pieces for Instagram headquarters

This middle design illustrates IG’s adolescence—connecting voices, creating empathy (the stems intersect like two clasped hands), and bringing communities and cultures together. The flowers shown all bloom in midsummer.


Dana Tanamachi's creates stunning nature-inspired pieces for Instagram headquarters

This final design radiates from the center (expanding, growing, exploring) using a variety of wildflowers, symbolizing the the beauty and wild-ness a future full of possibilities holds.


Lovely work, as always.

House Industries set to release new book, ‘The Process is the Inspiration’

House Industries - 'The Process is the Inspiration'

One of my fondest memories of early design inspiration was receiving type catalogs from House Industries. In the mail. Like a physical object that I could admire, obsess over, and still to this day, maintain a collection of. I hope some of you readers remember these catalogs and/or still have some stored in your library, they were masterful examples of printing and typography.

Their work at this point is legendary so I’m thrilled to see they’re releasing a new book titled The Process is the Inspiration on May 30.

The Process is the Inspiration is a collection of helpful lessons, stories and case studies that demonstrate how you can transform obsessive curiosity into personally satisfying and successful work. If that’s not enough, there’s also plenty of over-intellectualized post-rationalization supported by hundreds of new images, our signature top-secret printing tricks, and thousands of Oxford commas. Most importantly, this book shows that there’s no sense in waiting for inspiration because inspiration is already waiting for you.

Couldn’t be more excited. This book almost feels overdue as they’ve been at this for over 25 years now and are still at the very top of their game with no signs of slowing down. Netflix needs to take note for their upcoming series Abstract, House Industries should obviously be a part of series 2!

You can pre-order The Process is the Inspiration by clicking here.

House Industries - 'The Process is the Inspiration'

House Industries - 'The Process is the Inspiration'

House Industries - 'The Process is the Inspiration'

House Industries - 'The Process is the Inspiration'

Powerful floral portraits by Ayumi Takahashi

Ayumi Takahashi

I’m a sucker for bright colors, plants, and strong women, which means Ayumi Takahashi’s work is right up my alley. She’s a well-travelled artist, being born in China, raised in Japan, moving to California to study at Art Center and then London at Central Saint Martin. She’s currently settled in New York, drawing, painting, and designing for clients like The New York Times, Paramount Pictures, Coca Cola China, and more.

What I love about her work specifically is the boldness and the cleanliness. I was totally sure that the images you see here were all digital. I was totally wrong, as they’re all done in acrylic, with all the edges finished so perfectly. Her color palette is extremely lovely as well, she does a great job of contrasting colors to give emphasis, it’s extremely well done.

If you dig her work you should check out her online shop. She has 16″ x 20″ prints available as well as smaller (and affordable) originals, one of which I happened to buy. Support artists you love!

Ayumi Takahashi

Ayumi Takahashi

Ayumi Takahashi

Ayumi Takahashi

Johanna Goodman pieces together fantastic, high fashion collages

Flowing gowns made of pink smoke. Haute couture hobbled together with blocks of wood. This is the idealized world Johanna Goodman is creating in her series The Catalouge of Imaginary Beings. Johanna describes the series as way to “explore a range of themes in popular culture – the role of the individual in fashion, history, the artistic imagination and the collective consciousness. The body of work draws its inspiration from Magical Realism, Surrealism and Symbolism and references such cultural artifacts as talismans, idols, and totems.”

The abstract nature of these feel playful and fun. Arms and legs jut out of tree stumps and the bits of background elements help to give each piece a bit of grounding, a sense of a world one could explore.

Johanna Goodman - Catalouge of Imaginary Beings

Johanna Goodman - Catalouge of Imaginary Beings

Johanna Goodman - Catalouge of Imaginary Beings

Johanna Goodman - Catalouge of Imaginary Beings

Johanna Goodman - Catalouge of Imaginary Beings

Johanna Goodman - Catalouge of Imaginary Beings

Johanna Goodman - Catalouge of Imaginary Beings

To see more from the series, visit here.

Kim Michey is Seoul’s most charming tattoo artist

I always wish I had more tattoos but I’m never certain what to get. I mean, once you’ve started it’s not something you can easily stop. Kim Michey is a Seoul based tattoo artist who appropriates pop culture icons and draws them in one of the funniest, cutest ways I’ve ever seen. Her line work has such character to it, almost like old comic books, but there’s a silly edginess to it all which you can’t help but enjoy. Next time you’re in Korea you might want to give her a call.

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Abstract artist Ellsworth Kelly passes away at age 92

In sad news, artist Ellsworth Kelly has passed away. He was famous for his minimal works of art, lots of boldly colored shapes against barren gallery walls, which for me were extremely tough to understand. How I began to understand and appreciate his work, the way it was described to me, was that his pieces were created to transform spaces, their very existence change how you perceive a wall or a large space. With that in mind it helped me contextualize his work and appreciate it more.

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‘Morbo’ explores the thin limit between the aesthetic and unpleasantness

I came across this intriguing series of images titled Morbo the other day and was stunned by them. Created by Six & Five Studio, which was founded by Andy Reisinger and Ezequiel Pini, these hyperrealistic works are a melange of real life forms twisted together into unsettling still life pieces, mixtures of natural and invented truths.

I feel like their disfigurement is a part of their beauty. There’s so many interesting facets to each of these pieces that I can’t help but stare in awe. It’s like when you see a person with a peculiar nose or a mouth slightly too large. You’re not staring to be rude, you’re staring because you haven’t seen features quite like that before. These unusual forms feel so real to your brain (despite being computer generated) that you can’t help but try to understand them.

My favorite museum in Paris: Palais de Tokyo

Palais de Tokyo

Museums in Paris were kind of a nightmare. This statement might be true of any major metropolitan museum but it was especially true of our recent experience. Kyle and I rode by Le Louvre one day and it looked like a madhouse with what looked like thousand of people milling about, Coachella in Paris. We couldn’t do it. Another day we attempted the Musée d’Orsay and again we were confronted with horrible lines. Time is valuable and I didn’t have the patience (the we did wait in crazy line at Versailles, which I would argue is worth it). The workaround for this line dilemma was visting the Palais de Tokyo, which generously open from noon till midnight every day but closed on Tuesdays.

Here’s my recommendation: Arrive for dinner at Tokyo Eat, their fantastic restaurant which is currently outside for the summer, around 9pm (try the Curry Rouge, très fantastique). After you enjoy some food and drinks, simply walk into the Palais, stress free. The current exhibits featuring Patrick Neu, Justin Just, and Tianzhuo Chen were beautiful representations of contemporary art, all quite immersive as well. Highly recommended.

Palais de Tokyo

Palais de Tokyo

Palais de Tokyo

Palais de Tokyo