Category Art

My favorite museum in Paris: Palais de Tokyo

Palais de Tokyo

Museums in Paris were kind of a nightmare. This statement might be true of any major metropolitan museum but it was especially true of our recent experience. Kyle and I rode by Le Louvre one day and it looked like a madhouse with what looked like thousand of people milling about, Coachella in Paris. We couldn’t do it. Another day we attempted the Musée d’Orsay and again we were confronted with horrible lines. Time is valuable and I didn’t have the patience (the we did wait in crazy line at Versailles, which I would argue is worth it). The workaround for this line dilemma was visting the Palais de Tokyo, which generously open from noon till midnight every day but closed on Tuesdays.

Here’s my recommendation: Arrive for dinner at Tokyo Eat, their fantastic restaurant which is currently outside for the summer, around 9pm (try the Curry Rouge, très fantastique). After you enjoy some food and drinks, simply walk into the Palais, stress free. The current exhibits featuring Patrick Neu, Justin Just, and Tianzhuo Chen were beautiful representations of contemporary art, all quite immersive as well. Highly recommended.

Palais de Tokyo

Palais de Tokyo

Palais de Tokyo

Palais de Tokyo

Nigel Evan Dennis’ digital organisms

Nigel Evan Dennis

I have a problem with buying art. My problem is, I don’t have enough room on my walls anymore. That’s why coming across the fine art pieces of Nigel Evan Dennis was additionally problematic. His work, a sort of juxtaposition between organic shapes in a digital landscape, is immensely beautiful and captivating. The lovely gradients and the particles floating above them are like a petri dish on an acid trip, and I want them all. He has 12 prints currently available for $100 each, go check them out.

Nigel Evan Dennis

‘The Beach’, an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

Last week I wrote about Daniel Arsham, one half of design/artist duo Snarkitecture, who this week have debuted their interactive installation The Beach at the National Building Museum. Instead of sand, you’re confronted with thousands and thousands of white balls with deck chairs set along the perimeter.

To me, the concept explores the space of art which is a public, mutually enjoyable experience. Rather than limiting art to sculpture or painting you get to be a part of a grander piece of work, much like what Tom Sachs did at The Armory or Urs Fischer at MOCA. The physical nature of the project is something that people can connect with and be a part of which might make a more meaningful impact on a person. You can see the manifestation of this on Instagram, with #thebeachdc having over 1,000 photos taken in 5 days, a very modern day metric of success. The art world can be so stuffy and staid and ideas like this will hopefully get more average people into museums and piss of the purist snobs.

Arsham summed up the project in a few words on his Instagram, simply stating “Reinvent the everyday,” which is a lovely way to think. On a side note, how great are these photos by Noah Kalina? He’s so good.

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

Geoff McFetridge talks with Monster Children

Geoff McFetridge

If you’ve followed the site for a while you’ll know my favorite artist/designer is Geoff McFetridge. He’s been an inspiration to me since the early 2000’s and his style and aesthetic has certainly influenced my own. Monster Children sat down with McFetridge to speak about his past (working with Girl Skateboards, Grand Royal magazine, and XLarge) his process (which is extremely process driven and a bit OCD) and the themes that continue to show up in his work over and over.

After watching this all I want to do is draw and paint.

Atelier 37.2 inhabited sculpture frames the view as art

Atelier 37.2 inhabited sculpture frames the view as art

There’s something beautifully poetic about New Horizon, the sculpture created by Atelier 37.2 for the recent Sculpture by the Sea Festival. As you walk into the simple plywood structure your perspective is immediately forced to take in the view outside though two windows, which frame the view lovely view of the sea and sky outside.

Atelier 37.2 inhabited sculpture frames the view as art

I like that the viewer is forced to enjoy these small vignettes of the world, the structure itself guiding your eyes thanks to the frenetic mix of wooden beams. With all the distractions that face us during our days I enjoy the idea of focusing on such marvelous views. We could all probably use a little bit more of this.

Daniel Arsham’s art warps and deconstructs the world

Daniel Arsham

I’ve been a frequent supporter of New York based design firm Snarkitecture for a while, truly enjoying their minimal yet clever ideas. Yet somehow I was totally unaware that artist Daniel Arsham makes up half of the design duo, a man well renowned for his incredible sculptures and paintings. Now knowing this there’s a clear through line between the works of his studio and his own output with his sensibilities shining through in both worlds.

Below you can see a few of his works that I truly enjoyed, though to be honest they’re all quite stunning. His three dimensional pieces in particular are great because they’re done to a human scale, increasing the impact of the expression. Crane.tv has an enjoyable video interview with him if you’re curious to learn more.

Daniel Arsham

Daniel Arsham

Daniel Arsham

Interview with painter/photographer Marilyn Minter

I’m a huge fan of Marilyn Minter and her paintings/photographs. They’re sexy, raw, juicy, bold, in your face, and amazing. She’s a powerhouse creatively and gives no fucks about how people try to classify her art or what’s right or wrong in the art community. In conjunction with her upcoming retrospective at the Contemporary Art Museum Houston, Vogue sat down with Minter and spoke about art, social media, and Photoshop. This part cracked me up.

How do you decide whether one of your pictures should be a photographic C-print or an enamel painting on metal?
I went to an art school [the University of Florida] that was invested in showing only the “truth,” which at the time was Abstract Expressionism. If you didn’t paint like de Kooning, they didn’t pay attention to you. I got a “C” in painting and an “A” in photography, so I thought, “I guess I’m a photographer.” I just didn’t know how to make anything without a subject. I became a photography major, but only ever worked in black-and-white. Color was verboten. With photography there was always something I wanted to change, to get rid of, so I started painting the photos. Now I decide to print a photo rather than paint a copy only if there’s nothing I can do to make it better.

But either way, you use a lot of Photoshop.
When Photoshop came around, I thought I’d died and went to heaven. When I hear artists say “Oh, the good old days” or “I’m old school,” I just want to puke. There’s no tool I won’t use.

Be sure to read the full interview here.

Mysterious Camouflage Self-Portraits by Lucia Fainzilber

Mysterious, Camouflage Self-Portraits by Lucia Fainzilber

Camouflage has always been intriguing to me. It was created as a natural defense mechanism though these days it’s more widely seen as a trendy fashions statement. Photography Lucia Fainzilber sees it in yet another light, a means to create a dialogue through art.

Fainzilber has always had a keen interest in fashion, and dressed flamboyantly even as a child. Now the artist, who also works as a fashion photographer, uses her images to show the ways we use fashion to convey identity, and the way fabrics can simultaneously cover us and express who we are. Fainzilber recognizes that sometimes clothing completely hides our identity, and many of her portraits communicate this feeling, as her own identity is entirely concealed, and further obscured by the world around her.

Mysterious, Camouflage Self-Portraits by Lucia Fainzilber

You can read more about her work on Artsy.