Category Typography

Burberry Prorsum’s Script Typeface Energizes Their Men’s SS15 Collection

Burberry's Script Typeface Livens Up Their SS15 Collection

When you think of high-end fashion does typeography spring to mind? Patterns and monograms are de rigueur in fashion branding yet type is rarely used to augment a brands presence and reenforce it’s identity. Brian Alexander at SLAMXHYPE recently did a nice job of distilling down the typographic use of fashion brands but how often do you see these typefaces gracing a garment? This is where Burberry has taken a new tack, introducing a beautiful new script which graces their Spring/Summer 2015 menswear collection.

Burberry's Script Typeface Livens Up Their SS15 Collection

Emblazoned with script in all forms they’ve made jackets and bags, scarves and portfolios. The Daily Mail states “the collection, entitled ‘Book Covers & Bruce Chatwin’ featured original illustrations and typographic prints that take their creative lead from vintage English book covers,” while the Telegraph specifically states that it was a “weathered Bruce Chatwin first edition” which provided the inspiration. Christopher Bailey, Burberry’s Chief Creative and CEO, is well known as a book lover, so the stories certainly fit.

For me the collection feels like a bold experiment which uses this lovely script as a visual element, but also as a brand element. The exaggerated scale of the type abstracts it just enough. It piques your interest just slightly but doesn’t detract from the garments and accessories. I’m curious to see if other brands pick up on this trend in their next collections or if this is simply a summer fling with typography. Even so, I applaud Mr. Bailey for bringing a bit of the graphic design world into his fashion design world.

Burberry's Script Typeface Livens Up Their SS15 Collection

Burberry's Script Typeface Livens Up Their SS15 Collection

Dave Foster’s Intricate Hand-lettered Tweets

MayDave_2

Handlettering tends to be the skill I see designers practicing most outside of client work — taking on personal projects to better hone their abilities and style. Sydney-based letter and typographer Dave Foster  came up with a clever, engaging way to do so while also promoting his name. Using the clever #MayDave, Foster’s been handlettering his tweets for the entire month of May.

“Tweets are engaging, I thought it was a good way to advertise and grow my following while showing what I do,” Foster said on why he chose Twitter. “The length was capped too, which I felt would limit the difficulty somewhat.”

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Portfolio Update: Emory Allen

Emory Allen

Illustrator, typographer, and all around talented guy Emory Allen updated his portfolio recently with some new work. On showcase is a slew of expressive illustrations which most of the time have some sort of type intermingled. The piece above is basically my Friday spirit animal. Be sure to also check out his Downloads section where he has some sweet backgrounds for your phone, tablet, and desktop.

Emory Allen

Emory Allen

‘Gastrotypographicalassemblage’ Finds A New Home at The Culinary Institute of America

Gastrotypographicalassemblage

Gastrotypographicalassemblage is a a massive 35 feet long by 8.5 feet high installation which combines two of my favorite things, typography and food. Created by Lou Dorfsman in 1966 (along with the help of designer Herb Lubalin) to grace the walls of the CBS building in Manhattan, the piece featured over 1,650 individual letters spelling out culinary terminology and expressions, as well as 65 food-related objects. Unfortunately the art was removed when the building was sold in 1989 though thankfully it was saved by designer Nick Fasciano and Dorfsman himself from remaining in the dumpster.

For the past 25 years though the work has been kept in storage, looking for a new place to reside. Thankfully The Culinary Institute of America has found it a home in it’s Hudson Valley campus. The video below tells he story of Gastrotypographicalassemblage and it’s recreation at the CIA. It’s great to see that such a wonderful piece like this didn’t get lost in the shuffle of time.

Comic Neue – A Designer’s Attempt At “Bettering” Comic Sans

Comic Neue - A Designer’s Attempt At "Bettering" Comic Sans

I never expected to seriously be writing about Comic Sans. The occasional reference for humor is a low hanging fruit to any typography writer but here we go. In all seriousness, let’s talk about the world’s most hated typeface because designer Craig Rozynski challenged himself to redesign it.

First, let’s look at the history of Comic Sans via Just My Type by Simon Garfield, because I believe that the world is too harsh on Vincent Connare. You might say he’s the person you curse under your breath when you see that passive aggressive note about cleaning the microwave at the office — but really he’s only partially to blame.

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Eye-Popping Marbled Typography by M&E

M and E for Offset

M&E is the design studio of Matthew Bolger and Emelie Lidström. The couple live and work in the Swedish city of Malmö where they combine design, illustration, photography and typography to amazing effect.

Recently they made some great work for OFFSET; a creative conference in Dublin which took place last month. M&E created lots of promotional material and branding for the conference but it was their short colorful video stings that introduced each speaker which really caught my eye.

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Zipeng Zhu’s Pulsing, Electric Typeface

You don’t often see animated typefaces often and for good reason, they’re generally meant to be legible and practical. Except there are cases like Zipeng Zhu’s Electrica typeface, inspired by electronic music, which defy the norm and offer up a pulsing, nonstop type that could potentially make you have a little seizure. Still, it’s an interesting concept that pushes the boundaries if what we usually consider to be type design.

Zipeng Zhu's Pulsing, Electric Typeface

Zipeng Zhu's Pulsing, Electric Typeface

Winston Scully Gives Pencil Packaging A Facelift

WinstonScully_Pencils3

Everyone can picture a classic No. 2. Usually yellow, metal end capped with soft, pink rubber. It is a versatile symbol of creativity, art, potential, academics, anxiety and seemingly endless rounds of bubbling in tiny circles for answers A, B, C or D. The pencil is incredibly recognizable but I can barely drum up the name of a brand, let alone imagine the packaging from which the pencil came in fresh and waiting to be sharpened.

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Upside Down, Left To Right: A Letterpress Film

Upside Down, Left To Right: A Letterpress Film

Danny Cooke has a series of documentaries he’s been working on, and this one about letterpress is my personal favorite. It’s a short film featuring one of the few remaining movable-type printing workshops in the UK, situated at Plymouth University. It features printer Paul Collier as he goes through the motions (but not in a bad way!) of printing out some rather beautiful pieces. Be sure to watch till the end for the credits, which are all letterpressed.