Category Lego

The Grand Budapest Hotel Made Entirely From LEGO

The Grand Budapest Hotel Made Entirely From LEGO

Over the weekend I was fortunate enough to run into this giant model of the Grand Budapest Hotel, made completely out of LEGO. This masterpiece is constructed from over 50,000 LEGO bricks and took more than 575 hours to complete. You have to admire this team for having the skill and patience to create something of this scale. Check out the video below for a behind-the-scenes look at how they did it.

The Grand Budapest Hotel Made Entirely From LEGO

Original Mac Computer Made Out of Legos

Original Mac Computer Made Out of LEGO

Chris McVeigh, a Halifax based designer, recently released this brilliantly designed original Apple Macintosh computer which is made entirely out of Lego bricks. If you’re unfamiliar with the original Mac you can click here and you’ll see just how spot on he got it. It’s the details, like the extra room for your fingers where the disk drive is, or the fans on the side, even the corner on the back of the computer, it’s spot on. Chris made an update to his Flickr page saying he’ll share the building guide for this model in the next couple of weeks. For those interested, be on the lookout.

‘In Pieces’ – Hyper-photographic realism and LEGO mix to amazing effect

"In Pieces" by Dean West & Nathan Sawaya 1

"In Pieces" by Dean West & Nathan Sawaya 2

"In Pieces" by Dean West & Nathan Sawaya 3

In Pieces is the name of a fantastic multi-media collaboration between the photographer Dean West and the LEGO-sculptor Nathan Sawaya. The series explores the idea that identity exists today predominantly as a cultural creation and something which has been heavily commercialized and manipulated.

West and Sawaya’s images play with the artifice of modern photography, creating hyper-real images that include amazing LEGO sculptures hidden within each picture. Attempting to discover Sawaya’s sculptures is where the fun begins, and once they reveal themselves they highlight exactly how manipulated and artificial photographs can be.

Sawaya’s sculptures are beautifully rendered and their pixelated-forms emphasize the fabricated nature of modern photography. It’s a wonderful series and a great idea. You can view the full series of photographs online at Dean West’s webiste here.

"In Pieces" by Dean West & Nathan Sawaya - details

‘Star Wars Relativity V2’ – A visual mash-up of LEGOs, Star Wars and M.C. Escher

This is amazing! 16-year-old LEGO sculptor Paul Vermeesch has made a fantastic recreation of M.C. Escher’s famous “Relativity” print out of just Lego. Six months in the making, Paul’s ‘Star Wars Relativity V2’ is unlike anything I’ve seen before. Measuring one-cubic-foot, the model recreates a number of iconic scenes from the original Star Wars trilogy – telling the story loosely in a counterclockwise format.

Vermeesch say that he imagines the piece is made up of between 2,000 to 3,000 Lego pieces and it even includes several lights that illuminate the model from inside as well as an amazing mini-cinema tucked in at the back.

Make sure to go check out the complete set of awesomely nerdy photos here.

A LEGO man boldly goes where few regular men have gone before

Lego man launched into space

Lego man launched into space

Earlier this year, two Toronto high school students, Mathew Ho and Asad Muhammad, launched a tiny LEGO man to the very edges of space itself. Thankfully the crafty duo strapped a camera to the balloon, allowing us to enjoy the LEGO man’s epic journey.

Near the apex of the journey, the familiar blue sky gives way to an inky black, just before the balloon bursts and Ho’s and Muhammad’s rig starts its descent. The video and equipment eventually were recovered after falling back down to Earth.

An astrophysicist at the University of Toronto, Michael Reid, said what Ho and Muhammad were able to achieve is extraordinary.

“There are people that are doing it, but I haven’t seen many examples of 17-year-old kids doing it,” Reid said. “It’s a pretty impressive accomplishment.”

Giant LEGO men dissected by Jason Freeny

Giant LEGO men dissected by Jason Freeny

Giant LEGO men dissected by Jason Freeny

Not to outdo Philip and his last post about the LEGO Haunted House, but I saw these dissected LEGO men by Jason Freeny and knew I had to post them. Jason is pretty well known for his dissection illustrations and toys, showing the inner workings of just about every pop culture icon or toy out there.

Now he’s tackled a trio of 18″ LEGO men, showing their complex inner workings. I love the little details, like the fact that they have this mash of square flesh around their feet, and that the skin at the top of their head is quite thin like a real scalp. It’s also exciting that he documented the whole process, which you can see here.

Giant LEGO men dissected by Jason Freeny

Giant LEGO men dissected by Jason Freeny

Giant LEGO men dissected by Jason Freeny

Giant LEGO men dissected by Jason Freeny

LEGO Haunted House

LEGO Haunted House

LEGO Haunted House minifigs

LEGO Haunted House Interior

Aliens, pirates, vikings, castles, dinosaurs, even the wild west! Over the years, the folk at LEGO have brought kids (and grown-ups) to all manner of great places, yet for some reason they’ve never had a LEGO Haunted House. That is until now! Coming this September LEGO will release their first official Haunted House.

Home to Lord Vampyre and his bride, the three-story house is served by a monster butler and a zombie chef, as well as being haunted by two glow-in-the-dark ghosts! It’s a fantastic looking set and the designers have really done an excellent job with it. Retailing at a hefty $180 the set is still incredible and with a release date of early September, it means that you’re just in time to have the perfect accompaniment for your house at Halloween.

The LEGO Haunted House is released September 1st 2012

The Millenium Falcon constructed with 3D Legos in 3 minutes

The Millenium Falcon constructed with 3D Legos in 3 minutes

The Millenium Falcon constructed with 3D Legos in 3 minutes

The Millenium Falcon constructed with 3D Legos in 3 minutes

I know you guys love Legos, so I had to share this video created by Francisco Prieto, who’s created a 3D modeled version of the Lego Millenium Falcon. Taking over 3 years, Francisco created the video with 3DS Max and V-Ray, using 3,572,568 polygons and 670 hours of rendering time. To say this was a serious undertaking would be an understatement, clearly Francisco loves him some Legos and Star Wars. This is kind of magical to behold, especially the detailing that goes into the upper portions of the ship. I’ve also realized I would never want to try and build one of these for myself, I’d probably go nuts.

The Incredible Lego Houses of Mike Doyle

Mike Doyle Lego house

Mike Doyle Lego house

Mike Doyle Lego house

Last week I wrote about Lene Wille’s beautifully minimalist installation Metaphorical Horizons and since then I’ve had a number of Lego enthusiasts contacting me about work which they’ve made using the small plastic brick. One piece which really caught my attention was these incredibly detailed houses by Lego artist Mike Doyle. Mike’s sculptures are an incredible testament to both Lego, and his skill and patience. His largest and most recent construction Victorian on Mud Heap (above), uses nearly 130,000 pieces and took about 600 hours to complete.

With true dedication to the project Mike built these without using any foreign materials – there’s no wood, no glue, no paint in these – it’s just pure Lego. It’s a pretty amazing feat of design. Mike’s got a number of ‘making of’ shots on his blog which are worth checking out; I know my first reaction when seeing these were ‘no way, they can’t be real’ so it was wonderful to see some progress shots of them being made. Go check them out!

Metaphorical Horizons by Lene Wille

Metaphorical Horizons by Lene Wille

Metaphorical Horizons by Lene Wille

Metaphorical Horizons by Lene Wille

I have a less then subtle love for LEGO and recently it has been manifesting into a number of blog posts here on the site. What impresses most about the little plastic brick is the level of innovation that seems to come from it. As a material one would imagine that it must be quite limiting to work with, and yet people all around the world seem to be able to turn these little bricks into all manner of weird and wonderful creations.

Take Lene Wille‘s beautifully minimalist installation Metaphorical Horizons for example. Built back in 2005 as a graduate project, the installation is stark and sculptural and yet its use of material makes for something which is both fun and playful. Her aim was to create an installation which could work as both an object and as a space, and through her use of LEGO I think she creates something which is beautiful and restrained while also being inviting and playful.

Metaphorical Horizons was built at the World Trade Center in Amsterdam over a period of 6 weeks, the finished piece being built from 270,000 white LEGO bricks. More details and images from the project can be found online here.

Philip