Category Food & Drinks

Second Graders Eating a $220 Tasting Meal – You Can’t Help But Smile

The conceit is simple: Bring seven second graders to Daniel, a two Michelin star New York restaurant (it recently lost a star) to enjoy a seven-course meal valued at $220 a person. The result is a charming, honest look at food, taste, and the pleasures of eating. You can;t help but smile as these children give their genuinely honest critiques of each meal, in a way that only a child can do.

I appreciate head chef Daniel Boulud’s take on the endeavor, and his commitment to serving the food as it is, saying, “Children crave food they can identify. The seasoning has to be mild in a way, and simple. Here, we did it the real way.”

The Cat’s Meow: Suiyoubi no Neko Can Design by Yo-Ho Brewing

Suiyoubi no Neko by Yo-Ho Brewing

Last week I came upon this lovely packaging for Suiyoubi no Neko beer which is crafted by the Yo-Ho Brewing. I think the patchwork cat on the can couldn’t be more charming with a striking color palette that’s sure to catch your eye. This is but one of a series of great looking beers Yo-Ho is brewing, Serious Eats has a great rundown from last year of their line-up, which shows their care of both flavor and design.

Also of note last week was Kirin’s announcement that it would be purchasing a 30%-plus stake in Yo-Ho Brewing, showing that craft brewing is clearly the way to a larger market share. Still, the major Japanese beer producers, Kirin, Asahi, Sapporo, Santori, make up 98% of the beer market in Japan. It will be interesting to see if more small breweries are snatched up by the big guys to earn more cultural cool points.

An Insect A Day Keeps The Doctor Away

An Insect A Day Keeps The Doctor Away

It might (currently) be weird to admit but I’m quite interested in eating bugs. That is, with climate change upon us and food sources starting to shift there’s a growing interest in insects as a more sustainable source of food, and this concept is interesting to me. It’s also of interest to Noma and their Nordic Food Lab, which I covered on the site recently. Scientific American has a great write-up on their descent into entomophagy, the consumption of insects as food, and trying to prove that bugs are worth eating, for taste and sustainability purposes.

Eating Insects - Noma Science Bunker

The Nordic Food Lab has visited seven countries on five continents where entomophagy is practiced to learn more about traditional methods of preparation. Rather than importing an insect they’ve sampled, they seek edible equivalents that can be found in Denmark, such as members of the same genus or family that are prevalent in the region. Although they’re driven by deliciousness, they also emphasize sustainability. “We’re interested in sustainability in a more systemic way by focusing on how insects may fit into larger food systems,” Evans says.

From a creativity standpoint I find it pretty cool that a team of people is integrating locusts, ants, crickets moths, and bee larva into foods like beer, soup, and ceviche. There must be quite a lot of trial and error in a process like this though I’m sure it’s a part of the challenge. For me personally a larva ceviche sounds like it might be difficult to stomach but in the hands of a team like Noma can it really be so bad?

Noma Has A Science Bunker, Officially Making It The Coolest Restaurant in the World

Noma Science Bunker

Named almost consecutively (2010, 2011, 2012 and 2014) as the Best Restaurant in the World by Restaurant magazine, Noma is something beyond a restaurant. They’re best known for using locally foraged foods as well as their experimentation with food, using science and research to create startling dishes unlike anything you’ve seen before. To this end, Noma now has a “science bunker”, a series of refrigerated shipping containers which allows them to conduct experiments to discover new flavors. Scientist and research manager at Noma Arielle Johnson sums up the objective of the space quite well.

“It’s at some midway point between a test kitchen and a ‘lab’ lab,” she says. “Hopefully [the Bunker is] more like a kitchen. But we’re not actually producing dishes, we’re producing knowledge. In that sense it’s like a lab, but it’s a different discipline than a chem lab would have, it’s very much informed by the test kitchen and the service kitchen.”

You can read the full feature over on Eater.

Noma Science Bunker

Noma Science Bunker

Noma Science Bunker

Noma Science Bunker

Titillating Luxury: A Champagne Glass Shaped After Kate Moss’ Breast

Kate Moss - Breast Champagne Glass

Historically champagne has been known as a symbol of wealth and opulence. In the 17th century the champagne coupe was invented, elevating the act of drinking champagne, which became in fashion in the 1930s. Cut to 2014 and the coupe is getting a titillating new form in the shape of Kate Moss’ left breast. Yes, you read that correctly. 34, a restaurant located in the Mayfair area of London, has teamed up with artist Jane McAdam Freud to create the coupe, which is decorated with an art-deco pattern, and of course, Kate Moss’ signature.

There’s something entirely ridiculous about this concept that I love. From a press angle view point I’ve seen the story told that the coupe was originally shaped from Marie Antoinette’s breast, though that’s entirely untrue. Still, the extravagance of drinking champagne from a super model’s breast is too funny not to share. Is this the start of a new trend in sex organ shaped drinking vessels?

Clean, Honest Branding and Interior Design for Health Food Restaurant Mamva

Mamva Branding by Anagrama

Mamva, a health food restaurant based in San Pedro Garza García, Mexico, recently received some fresh new branding and interiors from probably my favorite design agency in the world, Anagrama. Mamva serves fresh smoothies, juices, salads, and paninis, so the branding and identity needed to feel clean, friendly, and honest.

Our proposal uses symbolism and easy, simple language to communicate friendliness and natural health. Drawing from the idea that eating healthy is the best medicine, we featured the snake thanks to its status as a symbol of health and medicine since ancient times.

The color palette and rough materials give a care-free tropical vibe. The logotype presents a built-in, all-in-one practical guide to everything Mamva, such as its schedule and phone number. The brand also uses a simpler version of the logo in seal form, a nod towards its excellent food quality.

You can see more imagery from the project by clicking here.

Mamva Branding by Anagrama

Mamva Branding by Anagrama

Mamva Branding by Anagrama

Mamva Branding by Anagrama

Mamva Branding by Anagrama

Mamva Branding by Anagrama

Chef Naomi Pomeroy Reminds Us How Lucky Are To Be Creatives

Naomi Pomeroy

I came across an interview with Naomi Pomeroy, renowned chef at Beast in Portland, who spoke with the Ace Hotel blog back in 2012. This year she won a James Beard Award and has been nominated almost every year for the past 4 years. This woman is damn talented.

In the interview they speak about Julia Child and the influence she had on Pomeroy, and this particular passage stuck out to me.

One thing about Julia Child is that she so clearly loved life. Do you think chefs are happier people?

I do think chefs are happier…usually. Sometimes we get too caught up in perfection and complexity though. I think that is why Julia makes such a great role model. She really showcased what is best about a GOOD chef. When something doesn’t go right, you just laugh, and turn to something else… It is a kitchen! We are COOKING and if we aren’t happy, we certainly SHOULD be. We are all so lucky to be doing what we love for work.

Replace “chef” with “designer” in all of those instances and I couldn’t agree more fully. Never lose sight of the fact that we have a pretty sweet gig, and however frustrating it can be, we’re lucky to do what we do.

Photo by Alicia J. Rose

Nora Luther Photographs Recipes As Dynamic, Floating Ingredients

Nora Luther Turns Recipes Into Flying Feasts

The earliest incarnations of the recipe come from 1600 BC in Babylonia, and since then, not a lot has changed (although we don’t use stone tablets anymore). A list of ingredients, a set of directions with cook times – this is really all you need. Berlin based photographer Nora Luther though has come up with a clever way of reimagining the recipe, by photographing all of the elements flying in mid-air.

Nora Luther Turns Recipes Into Flying Feasts

As she says in the project description, her intention is that “the look of the ready cooked dish is left to one`s own imagination.” The way she’s photographed the pieces of the whole are stunning, like a food ballet captured in mid leap.

Nora Luther Turns Recipes Into Flying Feasts

Nora Luther Photographs Recipes As Dynamic, Floating Ingredients