Category Films

Laurent Durieux’s Fantastic Retro-Futuristic Movie Posters


If you’re a fan of pop-culture, movies and retro-tinged illustrations then you’re bound to love the work of Laurent Durieux, a graphic artist and illustrator from Brussels. No matter what the genre, Laurent’s work is beautifully unique, often with a retro-futuristic vibe and plenty of sharp compositions with eye-catching details. His images have the ability to be filled with a wonderful sense of drama and story and his concepts pay great tribute to the films that he loves.

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The Radical Psychedelia of “Jodorowsky’s Dune”


In sci-fi circles, it’s considered a classic. Why it’s not a core book in high school English baffles me. But Dune is probably one of the only modern stories, so intricate and meticulous, that filmmakers have never failed to satiate the ardent fan base. David Lynch’s version seemed to only please Frank Herbert himself, getting eviscerated in the editing booth. The Sci-Fi Channel miniseries in 2000 was remarkable for its visuals (in 2000… who knows what we’d do with modern CGI) yet loses itself in a subplot of woeful trajectory.

Thus comes Jodorowsky’s Dune, a film by Frank Pavich, about one of the (possibly) greatest movies never made. Alejandro Jodorowsky, a Chilean filmmaker / writer / mystic, is most well known for his cult-classics The Holy Mountain and El Topo, but also his amazing graphic novel The Incal. Given the very first chance to adapt Dune to film, Jodorowsky’s legendary imagination was unleashed onto Arrakis. With HR Giger doing stage design before Alien, Dali playing the Emperor, and David Carradine as Leto Atreides, this already sounds like the coolest movie I’ve never seen. In describing his vision Jodorowsky stated about the spice at the center of the story,

In my version, the spice is a blue drug with spongy consistency filled with a vegetable-animal life endowed with consciousness, the highest level of consciousness. It does not stop taking all kinds of forms, while stirring up unceasingly. The spice continuously produces the creation of the innumerable universes.

Just wow. The documentary comes out March 24th. This gonna be good.

Haunting film poster by Neil Kellerhouse for ‘Under The Skin’

'Under The Skin' poster by Neil Kellerhouse

When it comes to the design of film posters there’s really only one person leading the way, and that’s Neil Kellerhouse. We’ve talked about his work many times before on the site and he’s honestly one of the most innovative designers out there, breaking the norms and clichés of major box office films.

His most recent work is for Jonathan Glazer’s new film Under The Skin, which features Scarlett Johansson who’s stalking and killing men. I won’t give anymore away, though the poster above does give you a hint of what she’s about. I think he’s done an amazing job on the colors of this piece, which to me feel referential to 2001. From what I’ve read the movie is supposed to be amazing, and I’m personally quite excited to see. You can see the full trailer below and judge for yourself.

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‘Notes on Blindness’ is an Eye-Opening Short Doc Not to be Missed


If there’s one video you watch today, you best make it “Notes on Blindness.” A beautiful short documentary by Peter Middleton and James Spinney, which captures the thoughts of a blind man trying to grasp a world without vision. It utilizes the actual audio recordings of writer and theologian, John Hull, aforementioned blind man, and couples them with dramatization. “Notes on Blindness” artfully documents the assimilation of grief, yet eventual insight, in what Hull describes as a “world beyond sight.” It’s an uplifting tale that’s sure to leave a lasting impression and open your eyes to the world that surrounds you. Continue reading

The Academy Behind the Oscars Gets a New Identity

Academy-Rebrand-1With the Oscars around the corner, a new identity for the Academy that’s behind it all couldn’t have come at a better time. While the Academy might be synonymous with the film industry, they seriously lack a visual representation and often get lumped in with their iconic effigy. California based agency, 180LA, set about bringing the Academy from the shadows and literally into the spotlight, introducing a modern identity of pure class. A rebranding that manages to reach for the future without forgoing the decades of history under the Academy’s wings. Continue reading

‘Grey City’ is a Documentary that Digs Deep into the World of Street Art


Interested in Street Art? How about art in general? Maybe politics is more your thing? Or perhaps you’re just curious about Brazil? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then Grey City (Cidade Cinza) is a documentary you should go out of your way to see. Weaving together an entertaining storyline, through the voices of famed artists (Os Gêmeos, Nina, and Nunca, just to name a few), the film uses street art as a platform to portray a variety of interesting topics: art philosophy, political corruptness, and how a behemoth city can be full of peculiar charm.

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Watch ‘The Shining’ told in the style of an 8-bit video game

Watch 'The Shining' told in the style of an 8-bit video game

The creative minds behind Cinefix have taken Kubrick’s classic The Shining and turned it into a rather faithful 8-bit video game. What really sells the game for me is the music, which is both true to old Nintendo games and the vibe of the film. I’d totally play this.

Trailer for Wes Anderson’s upcoming film ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’

'The Grand Budapest Hotel' poster

I have a theory when it comes to Wes Anderson and his films. The theory is that he makes two really good movies, and then one kinda bad one. This doesn’t include Bottle Rocket into the mix, but here’s my evidence:

Rushmore – Awesome
The Royal Tenenbaums – Awesome
The Life Aquatic – Turd
The Darjeeling Limited – Really good
The Fantastic Mr. Fox – Awesome
Moonrise Kingdom – Turd

Based on my scientific data, it seems as though The Grand Budapest Hotel is going to be a winner. That, and the fact that I laughed at almost every part of the new trailer, which you can watch below. I think I’m most excited for old lady Tilda Swinton.

Film review: ‘Gravity’

Film review: 'Gravity'

“Because we are human, because we are bound by gravity and the limitations of our bodies, because we live in a world where the news is often bad and the prospects disturbing, there is a need for another world somewhere, a world where Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers live.”

– Roger Ebert

Alfonso Cuarón’s newest film Gravity is a masterpiece. Roger Ebert’s quote above sums up what’s so special about the film, that it’s truly experiential, a piece of cinema that’s meant to be felt. It seems as though the lack of gravity freed Cuarón’s camera from convention. Long, sprawling scenes are paired with impossible shots to create something unlike anything ever before. The film is seen not only from the vantage of a safe, third party viewer, but also from a first person point of view where you feel the tension and the terror of the characters.

This tension ripples throughout the entire film. At one point you can equate space matter to the sense of dread that rises over you in the beginning of Jaws, as the shark slowly begins to tug at the legs of the unsuspecting skinny dipper. The use of sound, or lack thereof, further heightens this tension as you only hear the breathing of the characters or the gasps of your fellow audience members.

Stanley Kubrick may have said it best:
“If it can be written, or thought, it can be filmed.”

Hayao Miyazaki’s Swan Song, ‘The Wind Rises’, Rises to the Occasion


Hayao Miyazaki—writer, director, visionary, and all-around creative maestro. I love this man; having not directed a film since 2008’s Ponyo, his absence has been felt. 2013 marks the return (and sadly farewell) of Miyazaki, presenting his most recent piece of cinema, The Wind Rises. Having been out in Japan since July, it’s now making the festival rounds this part of the world (slated for western release February 2014). I had the pleasure of watching The Wind Rises at the 51st New York Film Festival last week. It was beautiful, it was captivating, and it left me walking away thinking, which is exactly what a good film should achieve.

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