The Top Title Sequences Of 2014

Art Of The Title Top 10 Title Sequences Of 2014

Good title sequences are much rarer than they should be, an aesthetic often only considered by those making the opening credits of a Bond movie or the show True Detective. Title sequences are about setting a tone and style for a show and do so by doing either very little or a lot. The episodes and show may chance but the title sequence is the one item that ties everything up, alluding to what an audience knows and will find out if they stay tuned.

Art Of The Title knows this best and, to celebrate, they selected their top ten favorite title sequences of last year. The selections span from video games to movies to television shows and even promotional sequences. While just ten sounds paltry, their picks span a variety of styles and forms. For example the brilliant opening sequence for the decent game Alien: Isolation not only falls into an homage category, echoing the original Alien, but set the tone for a decidedly creepy (yet glacially slow) game. It’s place at number ten points out how stellar a year it was.

It’s a good little list, considering many of the titles were part of wonderfully considered and executed design efforts in entertainment (which is a rarity). There is even the wacky inclusion of “Too Many Cooks” which is just as absurd as the video but—hey—it truly is at its heart a title sequence.

Read the full list and see all the sequences in question by clicking here.

January 15, 2015 / By

‘Moving’: A Stunning Music Film for Travis by Wriggles & Robins

'Moving' by Travis directed by Wriggles & Robins

It should be noted that we are fans of the directing duo Wriggles and Robins, aka Tom Wrigglesworth and Matt Robinson. Bobby first posted about Wrigglesworth’s (with Mathiew Cuvelier) short film, Le Mer de Pianos, back in 2011, and we’ve all continued to anticipate new work ever since. Thus, when W&R’s latest piece of cinematic magic hit our inboxes, we were gleefully flabbergasted as it involved projected animation, warm breath, and the band Travis—not exactly a combination you can easily visualize—and the results are absolutely stunning. We spoke to the duo to find out more.

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July 18, 2013 / By

Film Art: Neil Kellerhouse

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo poster by Neil Kellerhouse

The Social Network posters by Neil Kellerhouse

We’ve all said those three powerful words when deciding which film to watch: “This looks (insert negative or positive adjective here).” Whatever adjective finishes that short sentence decides the fate of that film for you. In my most presumptuous of moods I will judge a film based on what typeface they used in the movie poster. As a cinephille, I can be condemned for such triviality, but I believe the rule of first impressions always apply.

Production companies that design the brand identity for a film have the responsibility of maintaining that first good impression. The movie poster, the driver of that identity, can also be an indication of failure if it subscribes to the common and conventional denominator of ‘thoughtless design’. Successful poster design moves beyond symbolism to choose an interpretive vision. When interpretation pushes curiosity to it’s limits, a simple promotional movie poster can be elevated to into the caliber of art.

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March 18, 2013 / By

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