Category Fashion

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter ’18 collection

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

I’m always looking for inspiration for my projects and the world of fashion is always fertile ground to draw from. Last week, Marc Jacobs showed his FW18 collection at New York Fashion Week and it was a stunning affair. He sent down the runway a love letter to 1980’s haute couture, made up of exaggerated over coats, layers of scarves, and dramatic hats that transformed models into mysterious femme fatales.

What really spoke to me were the striking color combinations and the intense contrast of each piece that made the show all the more profound. The hues were vibrant and jewel-like, which radiated against deep shades of olive, plum, and blacks. The palette is certainly evocative of the 80’s but thanks to his styling and color pairings these look feel contemporary and of the now.

I’ve pulled swipe from Marc Jacobs personal and brand Instagrams to give a more comprehensive look of the output and the decisions that went into the clothes. I mean, how cool are the hairdos below? Those gradients are everything. Hopefully this sparks some ideas in your own work!

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Color Inspiration: Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter '18 Show

Liu Bolin turns invisible in Iceland for Annie Liebovitz for new Moncler campaign

Liu Bolin & Annie Leibovitz for Moncler FW17

Chinese artist Liu Bolin is a master at this craft. Meticulously painting his body, he seamlessly blends into the environments behind him, as a means of commenting on mans role with nature and social strife. So it’s interesting to see that his latest project is a collaboration with American photographer Annie Leibovitz who’s well known for her glamorous cover photos of A list celebrities. Even more surprising is that it’s an ad campaign for super fancy outdoor brand Moncler, who admittedly make some really great clothes.

The campaign started last season, photos from the SS17 collection are toward the bottom of the post, and now continue to FW17 with a journey through Iceland. I’m shocked that Bolin’s art of painting of himself still feels exciting and new through the years. It feels like he continues to try and outdo himself with each project and utilizing the incredible backdrop of Iceland is a smart choice. I love the incredible contrast of bright blues with the deep grays and blacks. Really stunning work created by all.

Liu Bolin & Annie Leibovitz for Moncler FW17

Liu Bolin & Annie Leibovitz for Moncler FW17



Liu Bolin & Annie Leibovitz for Moncler FW17

Liu Bolin & Annie Leibovitz for Moncler FW17

Kim Jones reveals brilliant camo pattern for Louis Vuitton

I’m by no means a fashion house groupie but there are certain designers I do admire, one being Kim Jones, who is the men’s artistic director at Louis Vuitton. Yesterday he revealed a brand new pattern, a “damier camo” as he calls it, which blends LV’s iconic check pattern which is overlaid with a blood red and a sky blue camo. It’s a striking combination that reminds me of the energy and spirit that Marc Jacobs captured for Louis Vuitton with his Stephen Sprouse collection. I’m curious to see how this ends up looking in the larger collection.

Viktor & Rolf’s Fall 2015 Collection makes fashion into art… literally

Fashion is art: Viktor & Rolf Fall 2015 Collection

There’s a division between art, and well, every other creative field. Is design art? Is cooking an art? Is fashion art? Viktor & Rolf tackled this conundrum with their Fall 2015 Couture Collection by creating what appeared to be works of art hanging on a wall that transformed into wearable pieces of fashion. I love this conceptually because it’s so ridiculous, something that few designers would try and tackle.

Surreal Purple Dunes Created for Prada Women’s SS15 Runway Show

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

When it comes to the fashion world and runway shows creating spectacular experiences to wow an audience no expense is spared. The clothes these days have to share the stage with the stage as the importance of Instagram and the sharing economy continues to grow. Recently, Prada wowed audience members with surreal, immense hills made of purple sand that towered over the parading models for their Women’s SS15 collection.

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

NY Times blog On The Runway had a great perspective of the show which illustrated how impactful the installation was.

The normally exhausted expressions that are plastered on editors’ faces during this time were replaced with actual, honest-to-God smiles (maybe the booze helped). The fashion editor Giovanna Battaglia has been working with some Milan-based designers for their shows this season (she said she would be at fittings all night Thursday night for one show on Friday), but she wouldn’t miss this.

“I’ve been consulting, but I stepped out and said, ‘This is the one, I don’t care, sorry, I have to stop working,’?” she said. “I have to go out and see Prada.”

The grandeur of this effort is brilliant to me. As I’ve been looking at these images I was imagining how difficult it would be to get all that sand to stay in place. A small detail but had to be so important when you have women in super high clogs and heels working their stuff. There’s also a simple beauty to the idea which I think helps it. It’s not over the top like Chanel’s grocery store runway show (which was impressive in it’s own right) but still has quite the wow factor.

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

Prada Women's SS15 Runway Show

Gary Baseman Creates A Quirky, Wearable Collection with Coach

Gary Baseman Coach Spring 2015 4

At this point, Gary Baseman has probably marked everything off of the bucket list for his career. He has won several Emmys and had a huge, traveling (brilliant) major museum show and even successfully funded a Kickstarter campaign: dude has done it all. The latest addition to this lengthy list of creative triumphs is a luxury fashion collaboration, one on par with Kenny Scharf for Jeremy Scott and Yayoi Kusama for Louis Vuitton: Coach enlisted Baseman to provide complimentary monsters for their Spring Ready-To-Wear collection. This sounds like it could be a troubling pairing, yes—but the collaboration is absolutely spectacular.

Gary Baseman Coach Spring 2015 1

Baseman’s characters are used in myriad ways: they are at the center of a few t-shirts, seemingly painted on purses, and even patterned very elegantly onto dresses. Like the shirts, the characters are even knitted into sweaters. No, they aren’t appliqué but woven into the material, a seamless and quaint and quirky effect that takes Baseman’s creations and transforms them from art objects or cartoons to these high fashion objects of intrigue. Coach wisely uses an understated palette of pastels—and a few complimentary prints like cheetah (which Baseman may have created)—to place his work at the center of the clothing. Moreover, the 1970s-meets-1990s design of the clothes somehow works here: it’s then and now, fake and real, imaginative and real.

What’s most surprising is this pairing: Baseman is phenomenal while Coach has become so suburban mall. Whoever thought to enlist over at Coach needs many, many high fives. The designer(s) who also worked with Gary to figure out how the pairing would manifest itself did an amazing job as well. Collaborations between art and fashion require a great amount of editing—and confidence. You can see more from the collaboration here.

Gary Baseman Coach Spring 2015 2

Gary Baseman Coach Spring 2015 3

Levi’s Made & Crafted Fall/Winter 2014 Lookbook Collaboration With Wilder Quarterly

Levi's Made & Crafted Fall/Winter 2014 Lookbook Collaboration With Wilder Magazine

Lookbooks for fashion brands must be tiring to make year after year. Most consist of moody looking models against a wall in alley or something variation of the sort. Levi’s Made & Crafted, the sub-brand that’s much edgier from a fashion perspective, decided to pair up with nature-centric magazine Wilder Quarterly for their Fall/Winter 2014 lookbook. Together they’ve presented the latest collection with a mix of classic product shots, interesting interviews with makers, and profiles on beautiful places and phenomenon.

Levi's Made & Crafted Fall/Winter 2014 Lookbook Collaboration With Wilder Magazine

Levi's Made & Crafted Fall/Winter 2014 Lookbook Collaboration With Wilder Magazine

Levi's Made & Crafted Fall/Winter 2014 Lookbook Collaboration With Wilder Magazine

The collection is a well-made mix of classics like leather jackets and denim paired with some pieces made with soem really interesting patterns. It also seems like the collection is extremely comfortable looking, like you could put on any number of these pieces and feel like you’re ready for the winter to come. Peter Stolz, LM&C men’s designer explains the inspiration for the collection.

The title that we gave the collection for Fall 2014 is The New West: Outdoor. We are constantly excited by the West Coast as an eternally inspiring and pioneering land. We were influenced by how we connect to the outdoors in a modern way. It’s about getting away from the urban hustle and connecting with nature––while also staying connected to the modern world. By contrast, we were also inspired by an increasing grassroots support of local foods, farms, farmer’s markets and local, seasonal ingredients and materials found in cities.

Levi's Made & Crafted Fall/Winter 2014 Lookbook Collaboration With Wilder Magazine

Levi's Made & Crafted Fall/Winter 2014 Lookbook Collaboration With Wilder Magazine

Levi's Made & Crafted Fall/Winter 2014 Lookbook Collaboration With Wilder Magazine

Overall I think Wilder Quarterly has done what they do best, which is creating interesting stories around makers and their crafts, as well as writing stories on star watching and seeing the Northern Lights. The stories and features complement the fashion well and creates a cohesive feeling when you visit the site. You can easily imagine the site as a print experience but I’m glad it’s not. Translating an aesthetic to the web can be difficult but I think Levi’s has done it.