Interview with product designers Scholten & Baijings

Photo by Benjamin McMahon

Photo by Benjamin McMahon

Mr Porter has an interview with design duo Scholten & Baijings, famous for their brilliantly colored furniture and home goods. A quick Google image search is illuminating on their breadth of work. I love that they’re so process driven, working and working to find the right solution, until a product feels just right. Further, I think it’s great that they keep their explorations on display (above), understanding the importance of learning from one’s mistakes.

Quite how exacting this process can be is demonstrated by the set of ceiling-height shelves that separates the workshop from the main lobby. This is full to bursting with embryonic versions of recognisable products, such as the speckled, polygonal cardboard cups and saucers that would later become “Paper Porcelain” (issued by Danish brand HAY in 2009) and cast metal forms of pears, baby steps towards the “Fruit Party” centrepiece of 2008 (which now resides in the collection of Holland’s Zuiderzee Museum). These prototypes and experiments are not only clearly visible from within the studio, but also from without, thanks to the building’s glass façade. “If you’re on display in a transparent building, your work should also be transparent,” says Mr Scholten.

September 1, 2015 / By

A coffee lid you kiss to drink

Korean designer Jang WooSeok has created perhaps the creepiest coffee lid ever: One that’s shaped like a face that you kiss in order to drink. It’s almost like you’re drinking out of the face of one of those real dolls. Despite how unnerving this is I think it makes for a rather interesting piece of art, creating an odd emotional reaction where one is not usually found.

August 31, 2015 / By

Pantone Cafe

Pantone brings it’s patented color system to the world of food with it’s Pantone Cafe. You can nibble on a 13-0221 Pistachio Green eclair or savor a 17-1227 latte. The pop-up closes Sep 9 so you’d better book your tickets to Monaco soon.

August 30, 2015 / By

Wolfgang Puck cooks up a new brand identity

New Wolfgang Puck Branding

When I think of Wolfgang Puck, I think of… well nothing really comes to mind. To be honest, I imagine that horrible chef who yells at people and somehow has a TV show where he yells even more. Perhaps that’s the problem, I can’t off the top of my head think of who Mr. Puck is? I’m pretty sure I’ve had one of his sandwiches before but the memory is fuzzy.

Thanks to Pearlfisher, this might be changing. The London/NY based design agency has cooked up an elegant new identity for Wolfgang and his fleet of brands, which range from catering to the aforementioned sandwiches. This includes a new mark as well as a hairline logo which in my opinion looks quite sophisticated. The comments on Brand New disagree with my opinion though I think less is more with the overall identity which will help it stand out against their competitors. My only question: Where did the bar go in the A?

New Wolfgang Puck Branding

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August 5, 2015 / By

Candamill crafts bags with strong geometry and hard materials

Candamill - Untitled Clutch

Cindy and Cristian Candamil, brother and sister duo behind the label Candamill (read: not Canada Mill) are heading into their sixth season with some impressive work. Born to Colombian parents and raised in Queens, New York, Candamill interprets their aesthetic as “New Mid-Century” with a lens that finds opulence in simplicity.

I never post about woman’s bags but the form of their Untitled clutch (above) caught my eye with it’s striking design. I enjoy the duality of the bag, a soft, Cathedral Blue Italian leather that’s guarded by a brutalist, hand-crafted brass frame. This clutch quite literally stands on it’s own.

August 3, 2015 / By

Nigel Evan Dennis’ digital organisms

Nigel Evan Dennis

I have a problem with buying art. My problem is, I don’t have enough room on my walls anymore. That’s why coming across the fine art pieces of Nigel Evan Dennis was additionally problematic. His work, a sort of juxtaposition between organic shapes in a digital landscape, is immensely beautiful and captivating. The lovely gradients and the particles floating above them are like a petri dish on an acid trip, and I want them all. He has 12 prints currently available for $100 each, go check them out.

Nigel Evan Dennis

July 20, 2015 / By

‘The Beach’, an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

Last week I wrote about Daniel Arsham, one half of design/artist duo Snarkitecture, who this week have debuted their interactive installation The Beach at the National Building Museum. Instead of sand, you’re confronted with thousands and thousands of white balls with deck chairs set along the perimeter.

To me, the concept explores the space of art which is a public, mutually enjoyable experience. Rather than limiting art to sculpture or painting you get to be a part of a grander piece of work, much like what Tom Sachs did at The Armory or Urs Fischer at MOCA. The physical nature of the project is something that people can connect with and be a part of which might make a more meaningful impact on a person. You can see the manifestation of this on Instagram, with #thebeachdc having over 1,000 photos taken in 5 days, a very modern day metric of success. The art world can be so stuffy and staid and ideas like this will hopefully get more average people into museums and piss of the purist snobs.

Arsham summed up the project in a few words on his Instagram, simply stating “Reinvent the everyday,” which is a lovely way to think. On a side note, how great are these photos by Noah Kalina? He’s so good.

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

July 9, 2015 / By

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