Vaulted Willow, a colorful pavilion that looks like it could walk

When I think of the word “pavilion” I imagine standard 2×4 pieces of lumber slated together to make the most mundane of barbecue shelters. Architect Marc Fornes and his firm THEVERYMAN has succeeding in creating the opposite, a brightly colored shelter made from aluminum shingles that together create an amorphous blog that looks like it’s ready to slither across the land, titling it the Vaulted Willow. These are the objects I’d love to see popping up in more places, a thoughtful piece of architecture that tries to incorporate organic and natural forms.

Vaulted Willow, a colorful pavilion that looks like it could walk

Vaulted Willow, a colorful pavilion that looks like it could walk

Bobby Solomon

February 23, 2015 / By

The Kawara Chair finds a new use for discarded Japanese roof tiles

Designer Tsuyoshi Kawara has found a creative re-use for discarded Japanese roof tiles, utilizing them as the seat of his Kawara Chair. Using a wooden frame as the base Kawara has found a way to highlight the beauty and individuality of the tiles as they come in a multitude of glazes. And though a seat made of tile may seem precarious, Japanese roof tiles are fired at 1200 degrees celsius, much higher than the 800 degree temperature of European tiles, meaning that they can hold the weight of a person up to 250 lbs.

I love that the design is centered around a discarded object that already has an inherent beauty. Kawara smartly developed a solution for an object that was being discarded simply because it wasn’t perfect enough.

The Kawara Chair finds a new use for Japanese roof tiles

The Kawara Chair finds a new use for Japanese roof tiles

The Kawara Chair finds a new use for Japanese roof tiles

You can learn more about the Kawara Chair by visiting Domus.

Bobby Solomon

February 20, 2015 / By

Kara Haupt’s charming ‘Old Man Jägermeister’ concept

There’s something I love about redesign concepts when they relate to foods and drinks. We see so many of these products day in, day out that to see them in a new light fascinates me. Kara Haupt has created something that perhaps defies “redesign” and approaching the “reinvention” space, creating a new concept from something familiar. In my mind this looks like it would be an aged, super premium version of Jäger that you take shots of on your yacht. Plus, “old man Jäger” has a really nice ring to it.

You can see her full concept by clicking here.

Kara Haupt's charming 'Old Man Jagermeister' concept

Kara Haupt's charming 'Old Man Jagermeister' concept

Bobby Solomon

February 18, 2015 / By

Long read: A heady, inspiring interview with Experimental Jetset

Experimental Jetset

Last year, Collective magazine conducted an interview with Marieke Stolk, Danny van den Dungen and Erwin Brinkers, who are better known as the designers behind Experimental Jetset. They speak about they’re process working together, how you evolve as a designer, dislike of the term ‘target audience’, and much more.

In particular I loved their mentality, that they “don’t study theory; we live it”, which comes across in a very heady, sort of existential way. I’m not one to over-intellectualize ideas (you’ve read this blog, right?) and most of the time that stuff goes over my head. But you can tell that the guys from EJ, however deep their thoughts may be, really do live by their words.

We know, there are plenty of critics out there trying to make designers feel inferior, trying to prevent designers from making creative (and intuitive) use of theory, trying to force designers to think in a more ‘rigorous’ way – but really, to speak with Raoul Vaneigem, “such people have a corpse in their mouth”. They are supporters of a dead and rigid notion of theory.

Probably one of my favorite interviews I’ve read in a while, click here to read the full piece.

Found through Readdd

Bobby Solomon

February 18, 2015 / By

Famous city landmarks rendered in minimal line work by Studio Esinam

Came across these killer prints by Studio Esinam over the weekend which have landmarks and other notable buildings rendered in a minimal line art style. The effect is a series of works that are filled with wonderful details yet can sit comfortably in the most simplistic of spaces. I’d personally love one of these prints for my bedroom which Kyle and I keep relatively white and clean. I feel like I can relax in there better because of it.

You can view all 10 prints by clicking here.

Famous city landmarks as minimal linework by Studio Esinam

Famous city landmarks as minimal linework by Studio Esinam

Bobby Solomon

February 17, 2015 / By

Tobias Frere-Jones illustrates the basic mechanics of type

The always inspiring Tobias Frere-Jones has started a new series of posts on the mechanics of type and so far it sounds perfect for the novice and expert alike.

This new series of posts will explore what I call “typeface mechanics”, the behind-the-scenes work that makes typefaces visually functional. It is what placates the stubborn oddities of human perception, helps or hinders the user, and informs long-standing conventions of design.

The first part is about vertical and horizontal position of type. Logically you’d think all the letters would line up perfectly though unfortunately our brains don’t work that way. Take a read and see for yourself.

Tobias Frere-Jones illustrates the basic mechanics of type

Bobby Solomon

February 17, 2015 / By

Matt Cooper Shares His Experience Designing Line Icons

An Exploration of Line Icon Design by Matt Cooper

I enjoyed this post over on Medium by Matt Cooper who writes about his experience over the last 18 months designing line based icons. For a while there everyone was in a tizzy over whether or not line icons were legible or not though that fervor seems to have died down. Now we’re starting to see some well-executed icons in this style like the one’s Matt has made, which to me show the validity of line based icons.

If you’re curious to see more examples you should check out Designspiration’s collection of line icons. A plethora of icons to inspire your own work.

Bobby Solomon

February 11, 2015 / By

Siggi Eggertsson Makes Screensavers Cool Again with Saver Screensson

Siggi Eggertsson - Screensaver

The screensaver feels like an icon of the past. Sure, we all use the standard Mac screensaver with the photos of majestic looking animals or vibrant flowers, floating on mobile like strings that dance across our displays. Yet the screensaver feels like it needs a reinvention, a sprucing up if you will.

Icelandic designer Siggi Eggertsson has you covered with his new project Saver Screensson. Using his own drawings he’s created a screensaver that layers upon itself, creating incredible designs that shift and transform as the time passes. I’ve been using it since Friday and I can’t imagine going back to any sort of standard screensaver.

Bobby Solomon

February 9, 2015 / By

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