Category Design

Wolfgang Puck cooks up a new brand identity

New Wolfgang Puck Branding

When I think of Wolfgang Puck, I think of… well nothing really comes to mind. To be honest, I imagine that horrible chef who yells at people and somehow has a TV show where he yells even more. Perhaps that’s the problem, I can’t off the top of my head think of who Mr. Puck is? I’m pretty sure I’ve had one of his sandwiches before but the memory is fuzzy.

Thanks to Pearlfisher, this might be changing. The London/NY based design agency has cooked up an elegant new identity for Wolfgang and his fleet of brands, which range from catering to the aforementioned sandwiches. This includes a new mark as well as a hairline logo which in my opinion looks quite sophisticated. The comments on Brand New disagree with my opinion though I think less is more with the overall identity which will help it stand out against their competitors. My only question: Where did the bar go in the A?

New Wolfgang Puck Branding

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Candamill crafts bags with strong geometry and hard materials

Candamill - Untitled Clutch

Cindy and Cristian Candamil, brother and sister duo behind the label Candamill (read: not Canada Mill) are heading into their sixth season with some impressive work. Born to Colombian parents and raised in Queens, New York, Candamill interprets their aesthetic as “New Mid-Century” with a lens that finds opulence in simplicity.

I never post about woman’s bags but the form of their Untitled clutch (above) caught my eye with it’s striking design. I enjoy the duality of the bag, a soft, Cathedral Blue Italian leather that’s guarded by a brutalist, hand-crafted brass frame. This clutch quite literally stands on it’s own.

Nigel Evan Dennis’ digital organisms

Nigel Evan Dennis

I have a problem with buying art. My problem is, I don’t have enough room on my walls anymore. That’s why coming across the fine art pieces of Nigel Evan Dennis was additionally problematic. His work, a sort of juxtaposition between organic shapes in a digital landscape, is immensely beautiful and captivating. The lovely gradients and the particles floating above them are like a petri dish on an acid trip, and I want them all. He has 12 prints currently available for $100 each, go check them out.

Nigel Evan Dennis

‘The Beach’, an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

Last week I wrote about Daniel Arsham, one half of design/artist duo Snarkitecture, who this week have debuted their interactive installation The Beach at the National Building Museum. Instead of sand, you’re confronted with thousands and thousands of white balls with deck chairs set along the perimeter.

To me, the concept explores the space of art which is a public, mutually enjoyable experience. Rather than limiting art to sculpture or painting you get to be a part of a grander piece of work, much like what Tom Sachs did at The Armory or Urs Fischer at MOCA. The physical nature of the project is something that people can connect with and be a part of which might make a more meaningful impact on a person. You can see the manifestation of this on Instagram, with #thebeachdc having over 1,000 photos taken in 5 days, a very modern day metric of success. The art world can be so stuffy and staid and ideas like this will hopefully get more average people into museums and piss of the purist snobs.

Arsham summed up the project in a few words on his Instagram, simply stating “Reinvent the everyday,” which is a lovely way to think. On a side note, how great are these photos by Noah Kalina? He’s so good.

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

'The Beach', an interactive architectural installation by Snarkitecture

Max Touhey photographs Eero Saarinen’s TWA Flight Center

Max Touhey photographs Eero Saarinen's terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport,

Max Touhey photographs Eero Saarinen's terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport,

Eero Saarinen, famed architect and industrial designer, is well-known for the TWA Flight Center at JFK, a futuristic looking terminal that still stands as an iconic masterpiece. These days the space is no longer open to the public, yet photographer Max Touhey was given access to document the space, which surprisingly is still in amazing shape. Curbed NY has his collection of photos which highlight so many of the beautiful details of the space, which supposedly will be transformed into a 500 room hotel by JetBlue. This news may not please everyone though I’m happy to hear that people may yet again regularly inhabit the space.

Geoff McFetridge talks with Monster Children

Geoff McFetridge

If you’ve followed the site for a while you’ll know my favorite artist/designer is Geoff McFetridge. He’s been an inspiration to me since the early 2000’s and his style and aesthetic has certainly influenced my own. Monster Children sat down with McFetridge to speak about his past (working with Girl Skateboards, Grand Royal magazine, and XLarge) his process (which is extremely process driven and a bit OCD) and the themes that continue to show up in his work over and over.

After watching this all I want to do is draw and paint.

Solitaere is the perfect app for fans of simplicity

Solitaere is the perfect card game for fans of simplicity

A couple years ago Kiernan Flanigan released a minimal app version of the card game Hearts that I was a big fan of. I hadn’t played the game in years but I was immediately sucked into the app, playing it while I was bored in line or waiting for meetings.

Cut to now and Flanigan is now back with a similar approach, a simplified version of solitaire called Solitaere (I don’t know why it’s spelled incorrectly). This version takes advantage of the verticality of the phone, displaying your stack of cards in a device appropriate manner, though quite different from the traditional manner. If this new way is simply too much, you can unlock your orientation and turn your device to the side, giving you something close to the old fashioned way.

My only complaint is that you’re only allowed to play it with a three card draw, rather than 1 card at a time, which is much easier, thus more fun. That said it’s still nice to see an old game get a bit of life brought back into it.

You can download Soliteare for $1.99 on the App Store.