Posts by Nick Partyka

Mark Nixon takes poignant photos of childhood stuffed animals


We all had a teddybear. No? Then surely a rabbit or monkey, or perhaps some other stuffed animal you squeezed with loving delight? Mark Nixon, an Irish photographer, set about photographing a series of stuffed animals in his new book, Much Loved. An extremely endearing project that’s twofold charming, its universal appeal lies in Nixon’s ability to capture a notion that anybody and everybody can identify with: childhood.

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Randy P. Martin’s photos act as a therapeutic getaway


Photographer, Randy P. Martin, (featured here before by Bobby) has a new series titled We Are Tiny. Humbly referring to his photography as simply, ‘Travel Documentation,’ Martin captures his adventures to the corners of the globe in charming snapshots of the people and locations he encounters a long the way. What really captured my eye (or rather my mind) in Martin’s new set was the therapeutic nature of the work. We Are Tiny envelopes our need to travel while also highlighting the paltriness of our existence.

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The Academy Behind the Oscars Gets a New Identity

Academy-Rebrand-1With the Oscars around the corner, a new identity for the Academy that’s behind it all couldn’t have come at a better time. While the Academy might be synonymous with the film industry, they seriously lack a visual representation and often get lumped in with their iconic effigy. California based agency, 180LA, set about bringing the Academy from the shadows and literally into the spotlight, introducing a modern identity of pure class. A rebranding that manages to reach for the future without forgoing the decades of history under the Academy’s wings. Continue reading

New York City Ballet Art Series presents JR


New year, new New York City Ballet Art Series. Following the success of last year’s offering (featuring FAILE), NYCB has enlisted the talents of renowned artist and self-proclaimed “photograffeur,” JR. An annual offering that aims at introducing a new generation to the entertainment of ballet, the Art Series has established itself as one of the cities’ must-see attractions and offers a new way to experience a night at the ballet. Other than that, why else should you be interested in attending? Every audience member receives a take-away specially created by the artist.

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Sebastian Errazuriz’s ’12 Shoes for 12 Lovers’ is Simply Fantastic


One of my favourite showcases of this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach was that of NYC based artist, Sebastian Errazuriz, titled 12 Shoes for 12 Lovers. Utilizing 3D printing, Errazuriz went about fashioning a series of wildly imaginative shoes, inspired by the failed romantic relationships of his past. The passions of the heart have given way to timeless creativity, and Errazuriz has managed to hone his heartbreak to follow suit. There’s something for everyone in this offering—whether it be the fashion, the design, the tech, the writing, or the photography. If none of that, Errazuriz manages to at least captivate with something we can all relate to: love and heartbreak.

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Pantone’s Color of the Year 2014, Radiant Orchid, Reminds Us the Importance of Color


Out with the emerald, in with the… purple? Pantone has recently announced their selection for 2014’s Color of the Year: PANTONE 18-3224, or better known as Radiant Orchid. Referring to it as an invitation to innovation, Radiant Orchid “encourages expanded creativity and originality,” says Pantone. Whether you agree with Pantone’s selections or not, the “Color of the Year” is a friendly reminder to the designer in everyone to be conscious of the use of colors.

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Noma Bar’s ‘Cut the Conflict’ Raises the Bar for Politically-Fuelled Art


Graphic designer extraordinaire, Noma Bar, has recently unveiled his latest project, Cut the Conflict. In a global ‘crowd-sourced’ effort, Bar has collected materials from warring countries and die-cut them, creating images that bear his trademark style. It’s art, packed with a powerful message; the best kind. Masterfully executed with a gripping social commentary, Cut the Conflict takes Bar’s visionary art a step forward: from the page, to three dimensions, and into the minds of the politically concerned.

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‘Grey City’ is a Documentary that Digs Deep into the World of Street Art


Interested in Street Art? How about art in general? Maybe politics is more your thing? Or perhaps you’re just curious about Brazil? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then Grey City (Cidade Cinza) is a documentary you should go out of your way to see. Weaving together an entertaining storyline, through the voices of famed artists (Os Gêmeos, Nina, and Nunca, just to name a few), the film uses street art as a platform to portray a variety of interesting topics: art philosophy, political corruptness, and how a behemoth city can be full of peculiar charm.

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‘Art of the Automobile’ is An Exhibit to Take Your Eyes for a Ride


It’s said that “form follows function, but both report to emotion.” This statement could not be more appropriate in describing the automobile. One auction (turned exhibit), “Art of the Automobile,” presented by RM Auctions, celebrates the masters of vehicular design and the marks they’ve made on its history. Featuring over 30 cars, it’s on show at New York’s Sotheby’s galleries and is the first high-profile automotive auction that the city has seen in over a decade. To me, there’re many reasons why “Art of the Automobile” already stands out as one of the must-see exhibits to check out in NYC this year.

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Anthony Burrill’s “I Like It. What Is It?” Is A Book You’ll Tear Through (and Apart)


Graphic artist, print-maker, and designer, Anthony Burrill, is famous for his persuasive form of communication. His most renowned works (plus a couple new ones) have been collected together and, as of last week, published within a book, I Like It. What Is It? Not just any ol’ordinary hardback, this is meant to be read, and then torn apart and hung on your wall. It’s a fun project, but also reminds us to the current state (and possible future) of design publication.

“Burrill is a great designer because he makes you notice and appreciate truths that would otherwise remain dead and inert. His work has such resonance because it’s so true: we should all work hard and be nice.”
—Alain de Botton

Very much like an author, Burrill is an artist who works with language. But, he has found a distinct voice through the presentation of his words. He prints ‘language’ into pieces of art, so one can read his work, but also visually admire it as well. His process of image making is born of tradition, largely employing hand-made methods (screen, press, woodblock, etc.).


It’s a craft he takes seriously, working hard to select the perfect inks and papers to print his projects onto. It’s a dedication that pays off, you can sense the diligence by simply standing in front of or holding one of his works. It’s an aspect of Burrill that I’ve always appreciated, I never fail to fill of tenacity when I gaze into the pieces hung on my wall. Famous for pieces like “Work Hard & Be Nice to People,” Burrill’s style is now a highly recognizable one, so much so that publishing a book featuring his work is a no-brainer.


Consisting of 30 pieces (and sticker sets), the book is a tight little bundle, oozing aesthetic. Each design is printed on 355 x 279 mm stock, giving the book some weight and a sturdy feel. The backside of every design reveals the story behind the work. Flip through looking at cool project after cool project and learn a little something a long the way too. Not bad.


As if that’s not enough already, each piece is removable. Awesome. The book is wrapped in a manner that they’re easily detachable, the intent being you can read this book, but also use it too, affixing the works to wherever your liking.



In this month’s Creative Review, Mark Sinclair writes about the move of graphic design publications from traditional book formats to “products.” Paper-based creations, gifts, and new formats are appearing on shelves where books sit. It’s flushing a lot of money back into publication, as publishers are discovering new and creative ways to bring life back into the market. I welcome it, as products such as Burrill’s new book are well-thought, well-executed, and an evolution. I Like It. What Is It? is a Laurence King publication and designed by A Practice for Everyday Life. Kudos to these folks for pushing the medium.



I’ve always wondered about the statements in Burrill’s work. They’re bold, they’re colorful, and often carry a lightness of touch and humor. But what exactly do they mean and where do they come from? Are these his beliefs? Quotes? Something has always urked me about not knowing the origin (and intent) of many of Burrill’s messages. I can rest easy knowing that my questions will be answered within this book. The tales on the backside of each page are written by Creative Review’s Patrick Burygone; there’s sure to be many creative insights and learnings to take away.


I Like It. What Is It? is available for a mere £19.95. A steal, if you ask me. I’ve ordered two, one for the shelf, one to tear apart and hang all over the damn place. To coincide with the release of the book, an exhibition at London’s KK Outlet will be running November 8th to the 30th. If you’re London based (or planning a trip soon), be sure to swing by and soak up the wonderful work of Anthony Burrill.