Studio Brasch introduces “Digibana”

Ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement, has been around since the 7th century and is taught in over 1,000 different types of schools of throughout the world today. In recent years, the art form has started to be reconsidered, though the primary theories of shape, line, and form still ring true. So what would ikebana be if you removed plants entirely, relying on the limits of computers instead?

Studio Brasch introduces Digibana

Studio Brasch, led by Anders Brasch-Willumsen, has been posting some interesting pieces on their Instagram called “Digibana,” which are described as a “futuristic ikebana practice where moments of beauty are created and preserved only by a constant stream of likes and shares.”

I find this project so interesting because the very nature of ikebana is nature. If ikebana is informed by modern and emphasizes a connection to nature, can that nature truly be represented digitally? I do like that Brasch-Willumsen’s explorations range the gamut from realistic to synthetic, crafting these delicate objects which are beautifully unnatural.

You can see more images on the Studio Brasch Instagram.

Studio Brasch introduces Digibana

Studio Brasch introduces Digibana

December 21, 2018