Sophisticated Branding for Fort Point Beer Company by Manual

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Crafting unique, standout labels for a new beer seems like an awesome challenge. Making sure that the brew stands out in a competitive market can be difficult as well as creating a look that feels unique and original. Manual, the SF based design firm, has struck gold with this sophisticated look for the Fort Point Beer Company, a craft brewery located in San Francisco’s Presidio.

The brewery resides in a historic Presidio building that was formerly used as an Army motor pool. Their iconic location—close to both the Golden Gate Bridge and the Fort Point National Historic Site—provided inspiration for a modular, illustrative brand identity. The result is a brand that locals can identify with and, as the brand grows and becomes available throughout the nation, can be regarded as the new San Francisco craft beer.

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

I’m a sucker for gold these days (my team will back this up) and the black, white, and tomato red color combinations really make me happy. The geometric patterns have a playful nature which remind me of the work of Mary Blair, and at the same time honors a San Francisco landmark.

Fort Point Beer Company

The choice of a Copperplate Gothic-esque font pairs well with the bold, geometric lines that make up the label. It has a feeling of being both contemporary yet classic, bringing to mind the early days of San Francisco. The overall branding is extremely charming and inviting, and when you see the bottle it certainly looks like something new that you want to try.

You can see more images from the project by clicking here.

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

October 27, 2014 / By

David Chang: “I Hate Fancy Beers”

Miller High Life Print by Alan Hynes

As I write this I’m sipping on a Miller High Life, are is it’s been dubbed, the “Champagne of Beers”. I acquired a taste for it back in 2010/2011 when I was attempting to freelance during a recession. At the corner liquor store near my apartment was 40s of High Life which only cost in the ballpark of $2.50. So long as you kept the 40 oz. cool it was actually a pretty damn good beer. Even Bon Appétit agrees.

Which brings me to my point, this recent article by David Chang for GQ espousing his love for cheap beer. As he says in the article, which I also agree with, rare, obnoxious, snooty beers are great, this is not the reason for his piece. His argument centers around the area that he cares about most: that cheap beers pairs well with food. Here’s the paragraph where he knocks it out of the park.

For all the debatability of my rant here, let me make one ironclad argument for shitty beer: It pairs really well with food. All food. Think about how well champagne pairs with almost anything. Champagne is not a flavor bomb! It’s bubbly and has a little hint of acid and tannin and is cool and crisp and refreshing. Cheap beer is, no joke, the champagne of beers. And cheap beer and spicy food go together like nothing else. Think about Natty Boh and Old Bay-smothered crabs. Or Asian lagers like Orion and Singha and Tiger, which are all perfect ways to wash down your mapo tofu.

Couldn’t agree more. Also, as I tend to find random things when I research posts, I found the really sweet Miller High Life print by Alan Hynes (at top) which you might want to snag. Only $40.

October 27, 2014 / By

Everyday Surrealism: Chuck Anderson’s Skillshare Class About Creating Art from Photos

Everyday Surrealism: Chuck Anderson's Skillshare Class About Creating Art from Photos

Chuck Anderson

Lately I’ve been really impressed with the creative photography that Chuck Anderson has been posting to his Instagram lately. The aesthetic blends surrealism and blown out lights and colors which make for a visual feast. Now he’s offering a course on how to do similar things with your own photos in this Skillshare class titled Everyday Surrealism: Creating Art from Photos.

Artist Chuck Anderson is known for his surreal, colorful aesthetic and the way he merges photography, design, and art. In this 45-minute class, join Chuck as he photographs 3 scenes—architecture, a still-life, and a landscape—and then transforms each into a collaged work of art using (amazingly) a single mobile app.

Throughout the class, Chuck shares his vision so that you understand the philosophy behind every technique. You’ll refine your eye as a designer, sensibility as a photographer, and imagination as an artist. Whether you want more experimental images for an upcoming exhibit, album cover, show poster, wall print, or even your Instagram feed, this class is the perfect combination of vision, technique, and real creativity.

October 24, 2014 / By

Tiga’s “Bugatti” Is A Commercial Break From An Alternate, Sexy Dimensions

Tiga Bugatti Music Video 2014

Tiga may not be as prolific as we (Well, I.) would wish him to be but you have to hand it to the dude for sticking to a very strict aesthetic of high luxury circa futuristic 1986. He hasn’t released anything bigger than a single since his 2009 album Ciao! and, while Non-Stop is one of the best Acid House mixes in recent history, he still leaves you wanting more. Yet, when Tiga delivers, he delivers.

An example of this: his latest single “Bugatti” came out in July and offered a very Germanic, very eighties, and very contemporary fusion of Krautrock and Tech House. Just when the song was gathering a *thin* layer of dust, Tiga released one of his best videos yet that is like watching a mixtape of sexy late eighties commercials from an alternate dimension, where men receive ketchup bukkake treatments and women play backgommon on men’s crotches. Needless to say, some of this video is NSFW.

Directed by Helmi, it consists of quick cuts and dramatic shots edited to the metallic cadence Tiga bases the song on. It’s broken by shots of him in varying outfits shouting “BUGATTI!!” at the camera. Like the song, every “scene” picks up a different piece of debris that results in warping the reality of this eighties world: remote controls spit, sexy legs have lost their bodies, people turn to dominoes, etc. Helmi plays with a visual vocabulary over and over and over again, presenting them in different shapes and forms like parallel universes orbiting next to each other without noticing. The effect is hysterical and absolutely ridiculous—and absolutely Tiga. As the song’s lyrics suggests, the Bugatti at one point was the car to have if you are a macho, aggressive, power suit wearing, ski lodge loving dude who works in finance: the video is a parody of that.

While some has branded the video as “Wes Anderson Movie On Techno And Acid,” I say it’s more of a commercialist fantasy where Tiga gets to grab the tits of models from Esprit commercials while drinking Cold Duck. It’s a fitting follow up to the swank still “Plush” and cable access kookiness of “Shoes.” This is undoubtedly the video of the year. Or 1986.

October 24, 2014 / By

Dive Under the Waves With this Beautiful Video by Morgan Maassen

There’s something quite ethereal in the way that Morgan Maassen shoots water. The California native is a passionate surfer and through his photography he has earned himself great recognition within the surf world. Morgan describes this video as a “brief odyssey into the world that i cherish most” and it’s clear to see that love shine through.

Water by Morgan Maassen

Shot on a Red Epic inside an SPL waterhousing, the four-and-a-half minute piece was filmed in Teahupo’o off the south-west coast of Tahiti and along the north shore of Hawaii. They’re stunning locations and Morgan’s camera work really present them as dream-like places. I found the whole piece to be utterly mesmerizing.

For those interested, the track in the video is called “Shopping Malls” and it’s from the New Zealand based six-piece SJD. More work from Morgan Maassen can be seen on his website.

October 23, 2014 / By

Peter Mendelsund Discusses Cover Design with NPR’s Fresh Air

Peter Mendelsund

World-class book cover designer Peter Mendelsund recently sat down with Fresh Air‘s Dave Davies to speak about his craft. The interview covers the why of a book jacket, why dead authors get the best covers, and the future of physical books. My favorite part was his anecdote on the process he goes through when he designs a cover. We should all beware creating “Frankenstein” designs.

DAVIES: And typically, how many versions will you make up?

MENDELSUND: Before I’ll show a jacket, I’ll tend to make a hundred and up various versions of a jacket for it. And that’s before I show in to an editor or an author. And when I show something, I tend to show one – the one that I think really works. I tend not to show multiple options because that sort of engenders confusion in people. And then there’s this kind of – there’s this kind of thing that happens where people look at the various things you’ve made, and they want to pull the aspects of the various comps that they like and put them together in kind of a – into a kind of a Frankenstein jacket. You know, take the color from this one. And the type from that one. And the imagery from that one. Can you make something out of that? One of the interesting things about jackets is that the material isn’t really transposable in that way. You know, one jacket works well with those components. You know, you bring in a different color, and all of a sudden, everything falls to pieces. So I like to show one thing only when I show the client.

October 22, 2014 / By

Take A Sip Of The Debut Release From Gene’s Liquor

Laurent Gene's Liquor Delroy Edwards Los Angeles

Gene’s Liquor” sounds like a reference your mother would make regarding your Uncle Eugene’s drinking habit. Yet, that is probably the exact opposite of what Gene’s actually is: it’s a Los Angeles based collective focusing on retro leaning deep house. The debut release from Laurent (better known as IVVVO) is certainly intoxicating a simple statement of a back-to-basics approach to contemporary dance.

The release—GL001—is just three unnamed songs. The first track has made it’s way out into the world and it’s a song full of rattling attitude based in a basic back beat that last the entire song, framing handclaps, drum cues, knotted bass hits, light cowbell, high hat, and more. The influence of jazz is definitely present from the makeup of the song but it has been funneled through a Detroit vision of early techno. It ultimately lands among new house classicists like Medlar and Andres, which is a very, very good place to be in.

If this is your type of sound, Gene’s Liquor is a new label to bookmark then: they’re going to keep pumping more shit like this out. Moreover, you should also look into Delroy’s other label LA Club Resource. Catch “Untitled 1” below.

October 22, 2014 / By

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