Date Archives August 2013

Beautiful cut paper pieces by Liam Stevens

Beautiful cut paper pieces by Liam Stevens

Liam Stevens, a London based designer and artist, caught my eye with his simple but bold works of art. Much of his work involves drawings, creating both large, expansive nature scenes as well as simple, more restrained pieces which are more contemplative in their composition. What caught my eye though were these delicate paper cut images he created which he collects on his site under a category called Shapebook.

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Fantastic Pencil Illustrations by Drew Shannon

Drew Shannon - Mermaids

Drew Shannon is a Canadian illustrator who has been creating work for numerous books, magazines and websites over the last few years. Recently he created a series of editorial illustrations for Readers Digest and I think that they really captures what he does best.

For me, there’s something wonderful in the pencil textures and limited use of color that he uses. There’s a sketchy quality to his work and yet his images always feel finished. It’s a delicate balance but it totally works and it has a great energy to it! You can check out more images from Drew’s series below or visit his website to see more of what he does.

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The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Hedof

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Hedof

Hedof

Rick Berkelman, who works under the pseudonym Hedof, is a designer and illustrator based out of Breda, The Netherlands. His work is a vibrant mix of shapes and colors that gracefully blend in and out of one another, creating stunning imagery. For his wallpaper this week he’s delivered an ode to summer, featuring a sun bathing lady, a fancy cocktail, and some rather extravagant scenery for her to lounge around with. It’s an idyllic scene that I’m personally jealous of… I wish I could be doing what she’s doing right this moment!

Be sure to check back every Wednesday for a new wallpaper.

Type Nerds, eat your heart out over “The History of Typography”

Ben Barrett-Forrest's “The History of Typography”

This is a little overdue but if you haven’t seen Ben Barrett-Forrest’s “The History of Typography” video, you must. I came across this video a few months ago and promptly proposed to him via Twitter out of nerdy adoration. (He said yes!)

The Canadian designer and self-proclaimed type nerd, decided the world was lacking in good typography videos. Over 140 hours, 291 paper letters and 2,454 photographs later, he’d filled the void. Barrett-Forrest used traditional stop-motion techniques to illustrate how printed type came to be and how it has evolved since its start. The video gives background to italics, serifs and various categories of sans. The video felt like a condensed version of Simon Garfield’s Just My Type to me and will make for a great tool in beginning typography and design classes.

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A camera homage to (the style of) Braun & Dieter Rams

A camera homage to (the style of) Braun & Dieter Rams

A camera homage to (the style of) Braun & Dieter Rams

I’ve been seeing this camera concept by Kim Seongjin floating around the web lately, a beautiful homage to the design of Braun and Dieter Rams. The body is design is clean and simple with no unnecessary elements, beautiful curves and a minimum of colors. But does it follow the very principles that Rams idnetified to encourage good design?

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Hollow icons? A hollow argument.

Hollow icons? Hollow argument

Two days ago a story was published on Medium by a designer named Aubrey Johnson titled Hollow Icons. The story was about “why the practice of creating or using hollow/thin line icons in a user interface is, generally, not a great idea”, specifically the impending change of iconography with iOS7. This theory rubbed me the wrong way, for a few reasons.

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‘Time’, a 5 second project by Max Halley

This is a short animation by Irish designer Max Halley who turns a simple countdown into a something quite charming. I love how he imbued each number with a unique personality, and the transition between each digit is spot-on.

How do you get a job as a designer without going to design school?

How do you get a job as a designer without going to design school?

That’s the question posed in this Quora thread with some rather smart answers to go along with it. As an untraditionally trained designer who didn’t go to a design school, I certainly found myself agreeing with much of the advice on this thread. I did go to a junior college right out of high school where I took a lot of random art courses. These classes helped train my eyes and my brain to understand the basics of balance, color, and form. All in all I might have paid $500 for the groundwork that started my design career.

I also liked this bit from Eric Nord, one of the commenters on the the thread, who brings up a good point that we often not don’t talk about when we talk about creative work.

Regardless of whether you go to school, being a good designer takes a bit of talent. That doesn’t mean someone with modest talents can’t work hard and make a living as a designer. But one’s ability to thrive at it and constantly elevate and progress… is at least partly a function of talent. This isn’t just advice for the design field… it’s advice for any competitive field, but especially for “creative” fields.