Date Archives July 2012

Olympic Vermin: A hilarious short film by Amael Isnard and Leo Bridle

Olympic Vermin: A hilarious short film by Amael Isnard and Leo Bridle

Olympic Vermin: A hilarious short film by Amael Isnard and Leo Bridle

Olympic Vermin is such a great title for this video, featuring the scruffy creatures of London having their own mini-Olympic torch lighting. I have to say, I’d almost rather watch this then the real Olympics. Those rats are pretty cute (but you know, not in real life). Nice work from Amael Isnard and Leo Bridle.

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring André Britz

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring André Britz

André Britz

This week I tried to pick a wallpaper from the queue that would fit our sports theme in some way shape or form, so I thought this piece by André Britz was an interesting choice. André is a part of group of creatives called Britzpeterman, and you may remember these fantastic window installations they did in their office. On his own though he’s doing these really great illustrations which are dynamic and colorful, many of which you can see here.

With André’s wallpaper I was imagining a bunch of guys on the soccer pitch, getting ready to play a game of soccer. I don’t think this is necessarily what André had in mind, but I don’t think it’s far stretch. I think a lot of you are going to like this wallpaper for it’s simplicity and color palette. I also love the detail of the image in the hoody, it gives the piece just a touch of texture. A big thanks to André, check back next wWednesday for another sweet wallpaper.

Coca-Cola Beatbox Pavilion designed by Pernilla & Asif

Coca-Cola Beatbox Pavilion designed by Pernilla & Asif

Coca-Cola Beatbox Pavilion designed by Pernilla & Asif

Coca-Cola Beatbox Pavilion designed by Pernilla & Asif

These are images of the Coca-Cola Beatbox Pavilion designed by Pernilla & Asif. From the model, you may guess that the project was inspired by a stack of hot sauce packets, but it’s actually quite different. The project is an interactive musical instrument that you play as you walk through the structure and interact with its large panels. These panels are the ones lit to stunning effect at night with LEDs around the perimeter of each panel. The sounds are sports-centric: things like sneakers squeaking on a court, or “an athlete’s heartbeat” or an arrow hitting a target. Visitors to the pavilion with eventually make their way to the roof, which offers views of the surrounding park.

Great Soccer Player portraits by HelloVon x Nike Stadium

Back in 2010 the London based studio HelloVon collaborated with Nike Stadium to create a huge 17 window installation at Selfridges on Oxford Street in London. Designed to celebrate the World Cup, the installation featured 17 portraits of the world’s best footballers with each image measuring a whopping 5m x 3m.

HelloVon is the studio name of Von, a London based illustrator and artist. Von’s mixture of traditional and digital mark-making techniques creates images which combine old fashioned craftsmanship with a skill for creating very clever and contemporary images. His installation at Selfridges was a fantastic display of his talent, and I think his style of image-making is the perfect way to honor these sporting greats. Make sure to check out more of Von’s wonderful drawings on his site HelloVon.

Mickey Duzyj illustrates the finest in sports for Grantland Quarterly

Mickey Duzyj illustrates the finest in sports

Mickey Duzyj illustrates the finest in sports

Mickey Duzyj illustrates the finest in sports

Mickey Duzyj illustrates the finest in sports

Mickey Duzyj illustrates the finest in sports

I received a nice email from long time TFIB friend Mickey Duzyj letting me know he’d completed several sports related illustrations for the recently released Grantland Quarterly, issue three. Mickey created such an amazing cover, which covers the most important events of last winter.

The New York Giants’ second Super Bowl victory over the New England Patriots, the very sudden rise of New York Knicks’ guard Jeremy Lin, the death of the ultimate diva Whitney Houston, the sweet spot of NBA nerd fashion, and much more.

It’s amazing how he’s able to convey these epic scenes so seamlessly. The plotting and layout of this image is a work of art all on it’s own. Plus it’s pretty rad that he used a Giants themed color palette for the whole piece, making it even more consistent. On the inside he’s illustrated how to Dougie, and in the back he’s got a wide variety of different people (and creatures) taking a Tebow knee to pray, which is pretty hysterical. A big thanks to Mickey for pointing this my way, I’m totally going to pick up a copy.

A fantastic sports t-shirt design by Mike Lemanski

Nike Shirt Design by Mike Lemanski

Nike Shirt Design by Mike Lemanski

English illustrator and designer Mike Lemanski has created a wonderful t-shirt which is bound to get you in the Olympic spirt! His design is filled with great colors and energy, combining a number of sporting events together including diving, swimming, rowing and sprinting.

Created for Nike USA and released late last year, Lemanski’s style of illustration seems perfect for this type of project. Here Lemanski finds the patterns amid the arms, legs and sporting-equipment of the athletes and turns them into fantastic looking image. It’s certainly a t-shirt I’d like to wear! Go see more of Mike Lemanski’s work online here.

How long do the Olympics last? – Thoughts on Olympic architecture

Detail of Athletes housing by Niall McLaughlin Architects

Although the events of the Olympics are ephemeral, the games last only 17 days, the infrastructure that supports the olympic games is more stubborn. There are some exceptions this year, but buildings (along with roads, pipes and other concrete things) don’t typically pack up and leave after the closing ceremonies. So what will be the most stubborn, the most lasting remnant from this year’s games in London? Will it be the sensuous Aquatics Centre? The pokey stadium where so much of the games will take place? Maybe neither. It might end up being the less flashy and less frequently discussed Olympic Village that has the most enduring impact. These are the places where the atheletes stay, and there’s an excellent overview of the history of Olympic Villages on Design Observer, including this interesting tidbit:

“The first Olympic Village was built in 1932, in the Baldwin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles, but it was dismantled after the games and virtually no trace survives today.”

The essay talks about the economic potential of these villages, but I’m not sure if the London Olympic Village will become a booming economic neighborhood after the games – in part, because these things can’t really be predicted and in larger part because I went to architecture school and have no idea how money works.

A detail on one of the completed buildings in the Olympic Village caught my eye. Specifically, this athletes housing that was designed by Niall McLaughlin Architects. As you can see in the photo above, the facade is finished with pre-cast concrete panels that feature low-relief motifs taken from the Elgin Marbles in the British Museum. It’s a reference to the history of the Olympic games – games that originated in Greece. But because Greece is also known for it’s classical architecture, it might be construed as reminder about the timescale of architecture in the midst of fleeting sporting events. Architecture isn’t a stubborn remainder that’s hard to get rid of, but an enduring accomplishment and artifact about who we are at the time we make it.

Still, it isn’t the nicest reminder since not everyone agrees who should have the Elgin Marbles. And if the Olympic Village becomes derelict in a decade’s time, the thin concrete might be better interpreted as evidence of how prohibitively physical architecture will always be in a world that is now more compelled by things ephemeral and fleeting.

Nike’s 21st C. Windrunner V. jacket, a shining collaboration with Marcus Gaab

Nike's 21st C. Windrunner V. jacket, a shining collaboration with Marcus Gaab

Nike's 21st C. Windrunner V. jacket, a shining collaboration with Marcus Gaab

Nike's 21st C. Windrunner V. jacket, a shining collaboration with Marcus Gaab

Nike's 21st C. Windrunner V. jacket, a shining collaboration with Marcus Gaab

Nike's 21st C. Windrunner V. jacket, a shining collaboration with Marcus Gaab

Every time I see something new from Nike it feels like they’re helping to usher in the future, as least where clothing design is concerned. The 21st C. Windrunner V. jacket is a perfect example of that, tailor made for the American gold, silver, and bronze medalists at the London Olympics.

Nike worked with renowned artist Marcus Gaab to explore the 21st C. Windrunner V. jacket and it’s highly reflective properties. Modeled after a sportswear staple, the Windrunner is detailed with the trademark V-shaped chevron across the chest, dotted with ventilation perforations across the back and finished off with a hyper reflective shell that burns bright under the most subtle lights. Serving function and aesthetic, The “United States of America” is applied with precision laser technology, while the lower back is detailed with 50 perforations — one for each state. A badge on the inside of the jacket, placed over the heart reads “Team USA.” The jacket will be worn, along with two other key styles, by athletes from different sports on the podium as the world watches on.

It really is a beautiful jacket, and the way they’ve integrated the technology is so interesting. I love the idea of the 50 laser perforations for all the states, and the reflective material used will be pretty amazing when it’s photographed, as you can see in the video below. If you’re interested in getting a jacket like this for yourself, look up Nike’s Vapor Flash jacket, it’s pretty close to the same thing.

‘Enjoy Your Worries, You May Never Have Them Again’, a sports-inclined track from The Books

Tennis Court by Derek Hudson

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On my drive home tonight I started thinking about this track from The Books which does a good job of combining all sorts of sports sounds into one track. It starts out with the sound of a golf game, someone getting an eagle on a hole, then progresses into a tennis match, and then it just gets weirder from there. I’m pretty sure there’s some samurai sword action at the 1:58 in. That’s a sport, right?

The photo above was taken by Derek Hudson, a Paris based photographer who’s quite a talented guy. It’s from a series of photos he took in the Hebrides, which is an area off the west coast of the Scottish mainland. I love how odd this photo was, it’s just so crazy that this tennis court is seemingly out in the middle of nowhere. Be sure to click his name and check out the rest of his work, he’s got a really great portfolio.

2012 London Olympic Shooting Sports Venue, designed by Magma Architecture

2012 Olympic shooting venue designed by Magma Architecture

2012 London Olympic shooting venue, designed by Magma Architecture

2012 London Olympic shooting venue, designed by Magma Architecture

2012 London Olympic shooting venue, designed by Magma Architecture

2012 Olympic shooting venue designed by Magma Architecture

These are images of the 2012 Olympic shooting venue designed by Magma Architecture. The German-based firm has finished supervising the construction of the three temporarily London-based shooting pavilions where athletes will line up and aim weapons at targets 10, 25 and 50 meters away.

The temporary structures are covered in white PVC that stretches between huge, colorful dimples that accommodate ventilation as well as doors in and out of the venues. What’s more, the dimples keep the PVC skin held in tension, so the skin won’t flap around in the wind. When the London Games are done, the three structures will be dismantled and packed away, ready for reuse in future sporting events.