Date Archives May 2012

The Garcia Tote Bag by Hasso

The Garcia Tote Bag by Hasso

The Garcia Tote Bag by Hasso

About a month ago the kind folks from Colombia based Hasso sent me the beautiful Garcia tote bag you see above. Made by hand in Bogotá, Hasso has embraced a traditional way of making bags, employing “more than 50 skilled artisans who have been working with leather and tailoring since before we were born.”

I’d been a fan of Hasso’s bags for a while now, you can see I posted about them back in 2010. The design of their bags feature silhouettes that are timeless, somewhat familiar seeming, but really pretty unique. I chose to get theGarcia tote bag since I’ve ben on the look out for something that’s a bit nicer than the Monocole tote bag I’d been using. The bag is incredibly made and is actually suited perfectly to the things I carry around on a day-to-day basis.

The Garcia Tote Bag by Hasso

My usuals are a laptop, two or three magazines, a couple notebooks, some pens, my Apple headphones, a USB cord and my keys. The pens, headphones, USB cord and my keys stow away in the front pouches. The notebooks, magazines and laptop are divided into three sections in the main pouch. What I love is that the main pouch is secured using a piece of leather and a brass ball to keep your laptop from sliding anywhere. The front pouches have a similar leather snap closure, though with a loop so that they don’t come out of place. It’s these simple touches that make the bag feel like your stuf is totally safe.

The Garcia Tote Bag by Hasso

And as weird as it is to say, I’ve never owned a bag with so many leather pieces to it. It’s been cool to see how pieces like the leather straps have started to get softer and more flexible since I started using it. You can tell that this is one of those bags that will only get better with age. I think the last killer detail to the whole thing is the bright red interior. I think it brings such a lively feeling to the bag that wouldn’t have been there had they chosen to go with some more restrained.

The Garcia Tote Bag by Hasso

Overall I have to say that I love this bag, and I use it on and off with my Incase bag depending on where I’m going. If I’m riding the bus or my bike I take the Incase. If I’m driving to work or need to go to a nice event I take the Hasso. Funny enough (I swear I had nothing to do with this) Hasso is having a huge sale right now. The bag above is like $50 off, which is a pretty substantial cut. If you’re in the market for a nice bag (they also have some nice backpacks, dop kits and iPad cases) you should hit up their store soon before the sale ends.

I think it’s also good to keep in mind that Hasso is small company using local artisans. It’s always good to support the underdogs.

Digitally created landscapes by Andreas Nicolas Fischer

Digitally created landscapes by Andreas Nicolas Fischer

Digitally created landscapes by Andreas Nicolas Fischer

Digitally created landscapes by Andreas Nicolas Fischer

Since the end of Friday the posts have been feeling really “natural”, so I thought I’d try to ride that vibe for as long as possible. The images above look like rocky crags from some desolate mountain range, but they’re actually visualized bits of randomized data. They were created by a guy named Andreas Nicolas Fischer, a Berlin based artist who “concerns himself with the physical manifestation of digital processes and data through generative systems to create sculptures, videos, prints and installations.”

I think it’s pretty remarkable that you can take data and make it feel natural. There has to be something in that, like the chaos of the universe or something. I wonder how long it took him to create a realness to these pieces? I’d guess that there’s a lot of fine tuning that needs to be done in order to control the random nature of generative systems.

Also, if you happen to be in Dublin, Andreas is a part of a show called Experimenting With Clouds at RUA RED as a part of the Glitch Festival. Check it out if you’re in the neighborhood.

‘Run Boy Run’ by Woodkid, Video by Yoann Lemoine

Screengrab from Woodkid - Run Boy Run

Screengrab from Woodkid - Run Boy Run

Many of you may remember IronYoann Lemoine’s excellent video for his Woodkid music project which we posted about last year. For my money it was easily one of the best videos of last year; filled with stylized action, stunning costumes and lush cinematography. Fortunately Woodkid is back with a new EP and Lemoine has really outdone himself with the new video.

The track is called Run Boy Run and Lemoine’s video show the titular boy of the song running valiantly through a dark landscape. Here he escapes beasts, birds and nature as he hurls himself towards his destination. The art direction is pretty flawless and it’s hard to imagine that we’ll see a more stylish video this year. Makers of music videos take note – more like this please!

The Honey Hunters of Nepal

The Honey Hunters of Nepal

The Honey Hunters of Nepal

The Honey Hunters of Nepal

Eric Valli is a French photographer who takes incredible photographs of some extreme situations. Back in 2004 he took this series of photos of the Gurung, a community of people who live in the foothills of the Himalayas. Twice a year the men scale the cliffs that are home to the world’s largest honeybee, Apis laboriosa. From the National Geographic article the photos were shot for:

The harvest ritual, which varies slightly from community to community, begins with a prayer and sacrifice of flowers, fruits, and rice. Then a fire is lit at the base of the cliff to smoke the bees from their honeycombs.

From above, a honey hunter descends the cliff harnessed to a ladder by ropes. As his mates secure the rope and ladder from the top and ferry tools up down as required, the honey hunter fights territorial bees as he cuts out chunks of honey from the comb.

For hundreds of years, the skills required to perform this treacherous task have been passed down through the generations. But now both the bees and traditional honey hunters are in short supply, according to scientists.

The article sadly begins to describe the increasing demand of the Apis laboriosa honey which is ultimately putting the bees at risk. The Gurung has been gathering the nests responsibly for who knows how long, but Nepal’s forestry department has “transferred ownership of the cliffs from indigenous communities to the government and opened up honey harvesting rights to contractors on a first-come, first-served basis.” I’m not sure what’s happened in the last 8 years, but hopefully the situation has normalized itself and the bees and the Gurung can go back to their natural ways.

I’d also suggest checking out Eric’s photos of the Raji Nomads who gather honey from the trees of the border of India and Nepal. The last photo in that sat is a beauty.

Lovely silkscreened prints from Justin Myer Staller

Lovely silkscreened prints from Justin Myer Staller

Lovely silkscreened prints from Justin Myer Staller

Last week I came across these great prints from Justin Myer Staller. Mr. Staller is a Philadelphia based artist who makes these great, photo-realistic images, and these ones of flowers are my absolute favorite. There’s some about the imperfection of these pieces which I really love, the slight jitter of the alignment. Then there’s the colors which burst off the page, making the print seem even more amazing than a real bouquet.

You can snag yourself one of the prints above for only $25.

Memorial Day

Memorial Day

We’re off today for Memorial Day, but I thought I’d share this editorial piece from the New York Times, which I think frames this day of remembrance quite well.

It has always seemed fitting to mark the purpose of this holiday — honoring those who have died in our country’s service — at the exuberant end of May. The outburst of spring is just slowing into summer’s cadence, and yet you can still smell and feel the biological crescendo all around you.

Whether it consoles the people who are gardening those graves is for them to say. And these years, after a decade of two wars, there are many lost lives to mourn. But nature is doing all it can to comfort. Life, it seems to be saying, continues on from summer to summer. There are memories and sadness, but also a verdancy that makes us celebrate what we have.

Alésia Museum by Bernard Tschumi

Alésia Museum by Bernard Tschumi

Alésia Museum by Bernard Tschumi

Alésia Museum by Bernard Tschumi

This is the Alésia Museum designed by Bernard Tschumi Architects. The museum commemorates a battle that occurred between Julius Cesar and the Gauls some two thousand years ago where the museum now stands. Although the scheme for the museum includes two buildings, these images are of the Interpretive Center. According to the architects:

The interpretative center is built of wood, much as the Roman fortifications would have been at the time of the siege. The roof of the building is a garden planted with trees and grass, camouflaging the presence of the building when seen from the town above. Visitors may look onto reconstructions of the Roman battlements from the roof garden, or stroll down a path to experience the reconstitutions first-hand.

Space Suit of the Week

Space Suit Motion Tests

Space Suit Motion Tests

Space Suit Motion Tests

Space Suit Motion Tests

I found these really incredible space suit motion tests through the Flickr of the San Diego Air & Space Museum, which is a veritable trove of space goodies. I’m not entirely sure what the back story is on these but it would seem to me that they were testing the mobility of the suits, making sure the people who wore them could move adequately to do their jobs (aka play golf on the moon). I doubt these images were never meant to be seen as “artsy”, but I can’t help but think of how cool they look.

Dear San Diego Air & Space Museum, if you own the rights to these photos you should blow them up to a giant size and sell them as art prints, make your fine organization a little money!

You’re All Just Jealous Of My Jetpack, a new Tumblr from Tom Gauld

You're All Just Jealous Of My Jetpack, a new Tumblr from Tom Gauld

Earlier this morning world class illustrator Tom Gauld announced that he’s started a Tumblr for all of his weekly Guardian pieces called You’re All Just Jealous Of My Jetpack. He says that, “some will be old ones but most will be new. The cartoons appear in the Review so they will often be about the arts.” There are only six cartoons up so far but they all made me laugh, so I’d say he’s off to a really good start.

‘Ballerina’ by Banksy

'Ballerina' by Banksy

I think there are a lot of opinions on Banksy, but one thing I’ve always believed is that he truly is a remarkable artist. I mean, I think he really does have genuine artist talent. If you look at some of his re-appropriated paintings, or even the proportions to the stencils he makes, you can see he must have had some sort of fine art training.

I think a bit of that comes through in this recent piece he posted to his site, a ballerina on the back of a painting, walking the string you would normally hang it from. Dare I say this piece is elegant, or even beautiful? Could I be bold enough to say that if Degas had used spray paint rather than oils it may have looked like something like this? I could, but that might rile too many people up. Instead I’ll simply say how nice this looks, and that it’s interesting to see Banksy making commentary on fine art culture in such a lovely way.