Date Archives March 2012

‘Ekki Múkk’, a new track and video from Sigur Rós

'Ekki Múkk', a new track and video from Sigur Rós

'Ekki Múkk', a new track and video from Sigur Rós

Yesterday, Sigur Rós released a brand new track and music video called Ekki Múkk in advance of their upcoming album, Valtari. It’s been nearly 4 years since their last album Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust, perhaps because Jónsi has been busy with side projects, as I’m sure other band members have been as well.

This new track is nice, a slow and steady 7 minutes of Sigur Rós-ness. That may also be it’s downfall, as it seems like something Jónsi could have made in his sleep. It’s not bad, but it’s not original nor epic feeling like the tracks from Ágætis byrjun. I started writing this post as an “OMG SIGUR ROS” but after listening to the song 7 times on repeat it’s just kinda… flat. Here’s hoping the rest of the album is more exciting. Here’s the tracklist:

1. Ég Anda
2. Ekki Múkk??
3. Varúð??
4. Rembihnútur
5. Dauðalogn
6. Varðeldur
7. Valtari
8. Fjögur Píanó

Immaculate Pay with Square icon by Robert Andersen

Immaculate Pay with Square icon by Robert Andersen

Browsing through Dribbble earlier and came across the designer of the new Pay with Square icon, Robert Andersen. I was simply going to tweet “OMG MY BRAIN EXPLODED” but I feel like Robert’s work deserves more love than that.

The image is detailed beyond belief, I can’t imagine where he even started with this. Referencing the holograms you find on credit cards, Robert has created a piece of art that I would absolutely frame on my wall. What’s wonderful to me is that he put so much detail and love into this icon, something that most people (non-designers) won’t give a second thought to. So please take a second, click the image above to see the large version, and soak in the details in this labor of love.

To see more of Robert’s work I’d suggest checking out his Dribbble account. If you get jealous easily you probably shouldn’t click that.

Erik Marinovich of Friends of Type has the best hand-writing ever

Erik Marinovich of Friends of Type has the best hand-writing ever

Erik Marinovich of Friends of Type has the best hand-writing ever

Erik Marinovich of Friends of Type has the best hand-writing ever

Erik Marinovich of Friends of Type has the best hand-writing ever

Erik Marinovich of Friends of Type has the best hand-writing ever

Today is Erik Marinovich’s birthday, so I figured the best thing I could give him was a post about how awesome he is, because it’s the truth. I’m not even sure how we met, though I’m sure Twitter was involved in some way. I’ve posted/worked with Erik a number of times, but if you’re unfamiliar with him he’s one part of Friends of Type, shares a studio space with Jessica Hische and has some of the best damn hand-writing I’ve ever seen. Plus I love his interpretation of Always With Honor’s fox logo!

He recently sent me a little care package, complete with a fully lettered package with an exclusive Friends of Type tote bag inside. I’m happy to admit that I didn’t throw the envelope above away and I fully intend on framing it. It’s a work of art that was made exclusively for me, and I’m proud to show it off. Happy birthday Erik, you talented bastard, and keep up the great work.

Update: One more thing. You should also check out this print he did for 8 Faces, and download the wallpaper he made to go along with it. This guy is unstoppable.

The Future from the Past: Spheres for living and leisure

A rolling, inhabitable bubble from the future as imagined in 1946

A 1934 proposal for spherical homes that roll in place and on to the next one.

Above are two similar but distinct visions of the future as predicted from the earlier half of the 20th century. The illustrations are from 1946 and 1934, both foretelling a future where we inhabit giant and mobile spheres. In the color illustration, we have an atomic-powered pleasure palace: a gyro-stabilized stack of decks, pools and dance floors. Why? Because of all the free time we were supposed to have after the end of WWII. The black and white illustration promises a future where our houses follow us wherever we move.

Although both proposals may look naive to us now, they confront a limitation of architecture that has persistently interested architects: creating non-static structures. And while there are plenty of projects with large, moveable parts, none have achieved this kind of mobility. It’s simply easier for us to move somewhere new than to drag our old house across the country like a giant ball and chain. The massive amounts of free time promised at the dawn of the atomic age never materialized for the american worker; so the roving plastic pleasure spheres might as well have been other planets.

Two completely opposite, but equally inspiring, image Tumblrs

STIKNORD

OTAKU GANGSTA

I was going through my bookmarked blogs last night and noticed that two in particular, while inspiring, are completely on the opposite ends of the spectrum. The first is a Tumblr called STIKNORD, here’s how they describe themselves:

The idea behind this blog was to produce a digital mood board to be used as a part of an on going project at Kolding School of Design. By building a collection of texts and imagery dedicated to the aesthetics of the North, we want to ease the often repetitive, time and money consuming process of constructing tactile inspirational material for each and every project.

As you can imagine the imagery is extremely serene. Lots of beautiful old shacks, minimally designed furniture and beautiful photos of nature. What I love about STIKNORD is how natural and timeless everything they post feels. That you could flee to the countryside and live off lingon berries and take up boat carving.

On the flip-side of that you have Otaku Gangsta, which in effect says fuck all that, there’s a crazy, contemporary sci-fi world out there to explore, let’s start dreaming. Or at least that’s how I interpret it. The imagery on Otaku Gangsta, which is run by Dietrich Groundsel, isn’t all futuristic, but there are certain pieces of imagery from the past that have influenced and reflect a potential future.

Despite how different each of these sites are, I find both worlds equally inspiring. They both manage to appease my sense of taste, almost like left brain and right brain desires being met. I yearn for a simpler existence but I can’t deny the fact that there’s so much more to discover.

‘A Tender Trap’ by Joel Alme

Joel Alme - A Tender Trap

Joel Alme - A Tender Trap

It’s a well known fact that the Swedes make the best pop music. Take Gothenburg’s Joel Alme for example. His song – A Tender Trap – is a perfect slice of baroque pop served-up with brooding vocals and melancholic lyrics. It’s the type of thing that the Swedes do better then anyone else, they can take all the pain of heartbreak and turn it into a life-affirming anthem, filling it with rich instrumentation and soaring melodies.

A Tender Trap is a great example of this, and the video allows us to peer into Alme’s world as he makes his way through the Wintery harbours of Gothenburg reminiscing on lost love and thinking about happier times. The song is the lead single and title track of Alme’s third album, which is released May 9th on Razzia Records.

The phases of the moon in a cup of sake – Moon Glass by TALE

The phases of the moon in a cup of sake - Moon Glass by tale

The phases of the moon in a cup of sake - Moon Glass by tale

The phases of the moon in a cup of sake - Moon Glass by tale

The phases of the moon in a cup of sake - Moon Glass by tale

The phases of the moon in a cup of sake - Moon Glass by tale

I love this playful take on the sake glass by TALE, a Seoul, South Korea who are doing some really fantastic work. Simply called a Moon Glass, the unique shape of the cup mimics the phases of the moon as you drink the sake. You start with the a full moon, and as you drink the moon begins to wane, just like the sake. It’s a clever idea that’s also unexpected, especially if you were to be handed a glass unknowingly. The sad part is that I don’t think the glass is for sale, or at least I can’t find anywhere with that info.

You should also check out there Matterhorn Glass, which has to be one of the best glasses ever to drink whiskey out of, especially if it were to be heavily chilled first.

Found through Design Milk

Koban Police Box by Klein Dytham Architecture

Koban Police Box by Klein Dytham Architecture

Koban Police Box by Klein Dytham Architecture

Koban Police Box by Klein Dytham Architecture

Koban Police Box by Klein Dytham Architecture

I think what’s particularly delightful about this small, boxy Police Station designed by Klein Dytham is that it turns the ubiquitous parapet into a kind of urban-scaled optic toy. The tall, white wall around the roof of the project is punctuated with cutouts that let folks walking or driving by the station see the shifting spectrum of colors painted behind the perforated wall. The project is appropriately extroverted (who really wants to spend too much time inside a police station?) and is as clever as any of Klein Dytham’s best projects. The wall cantilevers over one side of the project to make a shaded parking space for the patrol car and when the sunlight shines through the wall, it casts a punctuated shadow on the ground. Who knew a parapet could do all that?

A Simple Shelf We Made For Spring

A Simple Shelf We Made For Spring

A Simple Shelf We Made For Spring

A Simple Shelf We Made For Spring

A few weeks ago, Bobby and I were looking to buy some sort of bench or shelf to place underneath a window in our apartment. We wanted a little plant shelf, to introduce color and greens into our space (because it was completely devoid of both). While at CB2, we happened upon an old looking bench that was nearly $300. It was a nice bench, yes, but $300?? Are you serious?? I could get something for a fifth of the price if I hunted around thrift stores for a day or if I just built it myself. So, I built a shelf myself. And, you should too.

With a lengthy, impromptu stay at Home Depot and an hour or two of planning, sanding, painting, and planting, I refined the wood, painted it, and hung it while Bobby planted and readied plants. Within the span of about three, maybe four, hours and one hundred dollars from our pockets, we had this floating slate grey shelf that was just as good–if not better–than that expensive CB2 creation. It was quite simple to make too because all it is is a piece of wood I painted and sanded screwed into a wall by way of support from three brackets you don’t even notice. It was absurdly easy and so cheap: the wood, brackets, sandpaper, and paint only cost about twenty dollars! The plants and pots were the expensive part. (Yes, we spent $70 on plants and pots. It was an investment!)

If you have a free afternoon this weekend and want to change up your space for Spring, this is a simple and elegant solution. For more details on the specs of the shelf and more photos of it, check out Los Angeles, I’m Yours. Hopefully we’ll all start building our own shelves and objects and make it so silly homeware stores recognize that their prices are a *little* absurd–and that we can do what they do ourselves.

Space Suit of the Week

Spacesuit of the Week - Kyle Jones

I thought I would pass along this little gemstone that I stumbled across on Tumblr. I am really digging on Kyle Jones’ Space Cadet – and the rest of his work for that matter! His work reminds me of something straight outta Hanna-Barbera Productions circa the 1960s. I am particularly fond of the marshmallow clouds against the red horizon. I still can’t place the green rabbit friend of the cadet, but if this what the future looks like, I’m really excited.