Date Archives January 2012

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Denise Nouvion: Day 1

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Denise Nouvion: Day 1

Denise Nouvion: Day 1

We don’t work a lot with photographers on The Desktop Wallpaper Project, but when we do it tends to be a grand affair. You may remember the series we did with Kim Høltermand and his amazing images. Well this time around we have the beautiful photos of Denise Nouvion, who by the look of her photos lives in a dream world. You may also know her as one half of the group Memoryhouse, who we’ve featured on the blog several times before as we’re big fans of them.

I definitely jumped at the chance to work with Denise in an artistic way, and so we’ll be releasing her photos as desktop wallpapers all week long. Pretty cool, right? Today’s image is an idyllic field of corn, which looks pretty inviting on a rainy day like today (or at least it is here in Los Angeles). She does magical things with the color of her images, you’ll see what I mean as the week progresses. Grab this wallpaper today, but be prepared to want to change it throughout the week as we go.

You can click here to see the other wallpapers:
Denise Nouvion: Day 2
Denise Nouvion: Day 3
Denise Nouvion: Day 4
Denise Nouvion: Day 5

Colouroid, vibrant illustrations of everyday things by Kevin Dart

Colouroid, a vibrant illustrations of everyday things by Kevin Dart

Colouroid, a vibrant illustrations of everyday things by Kevin Dart

Colouroid, a vibrant illustrations of everyday things by Kevin Dart

While digging around Kevin Dart’s new Tumblr to get more info on the Persol video he recently did, I found this new minor project he’s working on called Colouroid. It’s a simple idea where he illustrates an everyday something from his life, be it food or scenery. He’s only done seven so far, but the results are pretty great. I love that each of these are made up of pretty simple shapes. They’re kind of like high level sketches, but I doubt most of us could make our sketches look so great. Here’s his description of the project.

“I am starting a new exercise which I hope to do at least once a week. My plan is to take photos of little scenes whenever I am out around the city, and then bring them home to do small color study paintings. I’m hoping it will improve my sense of light and color. They will all be done in a square format to limit the number of things I have to worry about.”

You can see the full selection of images by clicking here.

The imaginary organs of athletes by Katie Scott

Katie Scott

Katie Scott

The illustrations above are from the talented hands of Katie Scott. You can find a few recurring themes in her work: plants, crystals, plants inside crystals, and a novel approach to human/marine biology. The illustrations above were commissioned by the New York Times, and I love imagining how the insides of these athletes would work. Maybe if my inner giblets looked like this, I would be a better athlete and not worry every time I pass a ball game that the ball will go out-of-bounds and everyone will watch me try to throw or kick it back.

‘Do What You Will’ by Papercuts

Papercuts

Jason Robert Quever’s indie-pop band Papercuts are a group with whom I haven’t spent much time with, but their track Do What You Will has creeped its way under my skin and I’ve been humming along to it all day. There’s something charming about Quever’s voice, and the whole thing trots along on a sweet drumbeat which could have been lifted straight from the hazy days of The Velvet Underground. This is dream-pop at it’s sweetest.

The song comes from the bands fourth album Fading Parade which was released last March through Sub Pop Records. It was also accompanied by a neat music video which might be worth checking out. The album is available to purchase through Sub Pop Records.

Shipley & Halmos get a visit from The Selby

Shipley & Halmos get a visit from The Selby

Shipley & Halmos get a visit from The Selby

Shipley & Halmos get a visit from The Selby

I’ve long been a fan of the clothing produced by the duo of Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos, better known in the fashion world as Shipley & Halmos. I have a black cardigan that I’ve owned for a couple of years now that is hands down the best cardigan I’ve ever owned. There’s something about the cuff of the sleeves that fit perfect, some bit of elastic that makes it so that the ends never get stretched out. It’s a perfect detail that makes it a perfect cardigan.

Browsing around The Selby I noticed he paid the guys a visit and shot their space, so I thought I’d share it here. Having a space that inspires you is always important, and well, if I had a space like they did I would turn out amazing things every few minutes. It’s cool that everything in their space is mostly completely white, but is accentuated with punches of color. There’s a really great, lived in feeling to the space which makes the space feel so natural and wonderful. Hopefully something about their space will inspire something in your own.

‘Saint Nothing’, a new track from Daniel Rossen

'Saint Nothing', a new track from Daniel Rossen

I’m a huge fan of Daniel Rossen and his music. His contributions to Grizzly Bear are usually my favorite, and Department of Eagles is a fantastic side project for him. Now he’s signed to Warp records as a solo artist and will be releasing a new EP on march 19/20 called Silent Hour / Golden Mile, which Rosen describes being “like a unified declaration—about unease with the world around you, about indeterminacy in your own life, and the ability somehow to navigate both.”

The song above is called Saint Nothing, and if it’s indicative of the rest of the album, I think Rossen’s created something very quiet and special. The five song EP also features an appearance from Dr. Dog’s Eric Slick, so there’s that as well. For more info about the record, click here.

Space Suit of the Week

Spaceman by David Mach

Spaceman by David Mach

I am fascinated with the domestic lifecycle of spacesuits. They’re born from the hands of women hunched over sewing machines custom fitting astronauts, and then, after a brief interlude in space, some haunt the halls of the National Air and Space Museum while most lie neatly folded somewhere deep in the Smithsonian’s archival tombs next to gowns worn by celebrities and dignitaries.

Spaceman by David Mach, like many of other sculptures, is made up of hundreds of the metal coat hangers, like the ones that come with your dry cleaning. The hangers are welded together, formed in a positive mold and then sliver nickel plated. Mach immortalizes the Apollo astronauts of soft, white plush with the same cold metal hangers that are usually kicked to the curb after their serve the purpose.

Kengo Kuma and Patterned Castles (or what’s left of them)

The Museum of Kanayama Castle Ruin by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The Museum of Kanayama Castle Ruin by Kengo Kuma and Associates

The Museum of Kanayama Castle Ruin by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Two hours north of Tokyo, Kengo Kuma and Associates have designed and built the Museum of Kanayama Castle Ruin, Kanayama Community Center. The center’s designers construe the tradition of stonework and paving from the castle into a thin and graphic screen for the new addition’s facade.

The new project has a bit of a split personality. In relation to the historic site, the center displays information about the ruined castle; as a community center, the site hosts classes “to learn handicraft and dyeing.” Steep grade changes across the site necessitate that the building also act as a kind of retaining wall, something the architects refer to using an anatomical term I’m not familiar with being used in this context: “The entire architecture therefore is the breast wall.”

A Year of Sun with Mr. Persol (Video)

A Year of Sun with Mr. Persol (Video)

A Year of Sun with Mr. Persol (Video)

A Year of Sun with Mr. Persol (Video)

A Year of Sun with Mr. Persol (Video)

When I started watching the video above, I immediately thought to myself, “This is like a cartoon version of Monocle.” Well sure enough, I wasn’t too far off. This new spot for Persol sunglasses was put together by an A-list team put together by Winkreative, with Tyler Brûlé heading things up as creative director alongside the boys of Fleet Street Scandal, Kevin Dart and Chris Turnham, for direction and design. The color, light and sound of this pot is perfect and idyllic, making the brand seem like the perfect sunglasses for an extraordinary life. Kevin Dart did fantastic job at directing the spot, you can see some of the behind-the-scenes work he did over on his blog, and the backgrounds created by Chris Turnham are also quite spectacular to see. To see a full list of everyone who worked on the spot, click here.

‘Foreclosed Homes’ by Todd Hido

1956 by Todd Hido

1934 by Todd Hido

1968 by Todd Hido

These photos come from a larger series of images taken by the San Francisco based artist Todd Hido. Shot in LA during the mid-90s, each photo shows the vacant space of a foreclosed home, which seem haunted by untold stories. They are filled with the tragic silences of broken lives and by the challenges of troubled economic situations. What draws me to these images is Hido’s ability to capture poetic and powerful imagery with restriant and delicacy. He shows, but never tells. It’s a great series of photographs and the complete set can be viewed online at Hido’s website.