Date Archives November 2011

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Bobby Solomon

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Bobby Solomon

Bobby Solomon

This week was an off week because I actually didn’t have any wallpapers that I thought were ready, so I decided to make one myself. There isn’t really any backstory to this, I was just trying to make something that was simple and work well as the background to your computer/devices. I used my secret asset, a corner of the internet with the most awesome, random imagery, and was able to massage it into what you see above. It seems like some sort of fake fashion label or something, but it’s all made up! I hope you all dig it.

Bobby

The Beautiful Melancholy of George Shaw’s Paintings

Scenes From The Passion by George Shaw

Poets Day by George Shaw

The Resurface by George Shaw

Of the four artists nominated this year for the Turner Prize, it is the work of the Ilfracombe-based artist George Shaw that resonates most with me. Shaw’s landscapes focus on the mundane and he capture the melancholic beauty that can be found amid the overlooked and the everyday. Shaw finds this best in his hometown of Coventry and amongst the garages, houses and monuments of his youth.

His paintings of the Tile Hill council estate evoke memory and through the simplicity of his images he still somehow captures the bleakness and romanticism of the landscape. Shaw describes this best by saying: “I paint the paintings of all the times and all the thoughts I lack the language to describe.” I find Shaw’s work to be incredibly refreshing against that of the other Turner Prize nominees, and his take on contemporary art is really enjoyable. If you’re interested, I’d recommend checking out the video interview The Guardian did with him last week here. On December 5th I’ll definitely have my fingers crossed for Shaw when they announce the winner of The Turner Prize.

Philip

The complex and ornate drawings of Sougwen Chung

The complex and ornate drawings of Sougwen Chung

The complex and ornate drawings of Sougwen Chung

The complex and ornate drawings of Sougwen Chung

Twitter is my favorite medium for discovering emerging talent, it’s exactly where I came across the stunning work of Sougwen Chung. She’s lives and works in Brooklyn and she’s a graduate of Hyper Island, which makes sense when you see the caliber of her work. There’s a beauty and an elegance to her work that comes across in here delicate line work.

If love to see her imagery turned into textiles, could you imagine how rad a slipcover or a couch covered in her work would look? There’d be so much going on, I think it would be fantastic. Be sure to check out the rest of her work as well, she’s one not to be missed.

Bobby

If ghosts exist, they live in the photos of Delaney Allen

If ghosts exist, they live in the photos of Delaney Allen

If ghosts exist, they live in the photos of Delaney Allen

If ghosts exist, they live in the photos of Delaney Allen

If ghosts exist, they live in the photos of Delaney Allen

If ghosts exist, they live in the photos of Delaney Allen. That’s all I could think of when I looked over this Portland photographers work, filled with wild colors and random shapes. I don’t know how he makes these photos, if he’s using light to create the colors if these are naturally occurring, either way the end results are beautiful and mysterious. You can see more of his work by checking out his Flickr or his Tumblr.

Bobby

LGBT Creatives Series: Interview with Ben Tousley

LGBT Creatives Series: Interview with Ben Tousely

LGBT Creatives Series: Interview with Ben Tousely - Veckatimest by Grizzly Bear

LGBT Creatives Series: Interview with Ben Tousely - Sondre Lerche

Click images to enlarge

Who are you, where are you and what do you do?
My name is Ben Tousley, I live in Brooklyn and I’m a graphic designer in New York City.

What are you currently working on?
I most recently did some album packaging for Sondre Lerche’s self-titled release, which came out this past summer and is the second record I’ve designed for him. I’m currently looking into starting a self published magazine to showcase some of my friends work, but we’ll have to wait to see how that idea pans out.

For my day job I’m a designer working for Stephen Doyle at Doyle Partners where I’ve been helping with a redesign for a NYC art museum identity, some large word installations for the NY Times, a photography art book, building signage, and other fun things. It’s been a great experience for me so far. I like the sense of whimsy and humor he always tries to include in his work.

LGBT Creatives Series: Interview with Ben Tousely - Holiday Shores

When did you come out and what was the story?
I came out during my junior year in college, about three or four years ago. I think for me it happened naturally through a combination of pacing and good friends. Looking back, I think realizing it for myself was the hardest part. Then as I gradually started telling my friends, all of my anxiety about it faded away with their support. No one treated me any differently and that helped me realize how trivial it is — or at least how trivial it should be.

How does being queer effect your work, if at all?
As far as subject matter goes, I’m not sure it’s had much of a real effect on the work itself at this point. A lot of my design work has been for clients and I just haven’t really focused on it with my personal work yet. But who knows, maybe I will down the line. I definitely appreciate when it becomes an element of other artists’ work because I think it’s an interesting perspective to have in the world right now.

I also always enjoy meeting and working with other gay people through projects and that’s something I hope to keep up. Ed Droste from Grizzly Bear is actually the first person I came out to while we were working on Yellow House packaging and then this past summer his was the first gay wedding I’ve ever been to. That’s been very special to me.

LGBT Creatives Series: Interview with Ben Tousely

In your mind, what should gay pride be and how would you celebrate it?
I think it’s different for everyone and that maybe that should be the point – everyone has their own unique situations and it’s worthwhile to just embrace that and make the best of everything. For me, sometimes I think showing pride is simply not worrying about mentioning I’m gay to people I’ve just met, for example. I don’t see any reason to make a big deal out of it nor any reason to keep it quiet, either. I’m just happy to be who I am and to hope that people enjoy that.

That said — going to drag shows, wearing fancy clothes and/or listening to Whitney Houston are also things I think everyone could do a little more of. I have a pink postcard above my desk that I love from BUTT magazine of a glowing sign somewhere that just says “Why Not.”

The Mikenesses of Mike Holmes

The Mikenesses of Mike Holmes

The Mikenesses of Mike Holmes

The Mikenesses of Mike Holmes

Over the last few weeks I’ve really been enjoying Mike Holmes series of daily drawings. Entitled ‘Mikenesses’ – the drawings are part of a continuing series of self-portraits where Mike draws himself in the unique styles of well-known artists, cartoonist and illustrators.

It’s a really fun project and a really great idea. I think with every new drawing I become more and more impressed with Mike’s skill for recreating the qualities of each artist’s unique style. Above you can see three of my favorites – tributes to Michel Rabagliati, Quentin Blake and Hergé. Already Mike has clocked up an impressive 40 ‘Mikenesses’, so make sure you check out the complete set online here.

Philip

‘Things Fall Apart’ by Zomby, vocals by Panda Bear

Zomby

Zomby’s latest album, Dedication, came out in July of this year. Somehow it creeped around, not making a serious splash until the past few months – mostly due to heavy play at CMJ in NY and Thom Yorke’s BBC Radio 6 mix. Yorke’s mix showcased not only his love of the emerging west coast sound but how the beat music community has evolved to where hip hop / IDM / “-step” / garage are just inconsequential terminology. If music works together, then it just works together. Zomby seems to get that too. Thing’s Fall Apart combines the heady, skunky vibe of UK Garage and 8-bit beats under the meditative, reverbed voice of Animal Collective / Panda Bear singer Noah Lennox. Initially Zomby’s produces an ADD-influenced, frantic beat that feels in danger of catching itself. But Lennox’s voice reveals a focus, expanding the slight melodic changes to make it a standout track.

Eschewing the UK garage and “dubstep” sound that made him a minor star in dance circles in 2009, Dedication breaks the sophomore jinx. His debut felt exemplary of the genre that helped create him, embracing the rave sound. Yet here he bucks the convention, meandering into different genres and tempos irreverently. The frenetic jumps, melodic divergences, and heavy bass rushes make Things Fall Apart a great song and a perfect example of how music will move forward in the post-dubstep world.

You can grab this record here.

Alec

A trove of Peter Zumthor work

Peter Zumthor sketch from ZUMTHOR tumblr

Peter Zumthor models and drawings from ZUMTHOR tumblr

Peter Zumthor plan from ZUMTHOR tumblr

Let’s agree, this is proof that the internet is great. To fill the void where Peter Zumthor’s website should be, a humble tumblr site has been steadily amassing images of Zumthor’s work since late August. As proof that the internet is murky, I have no idea who’s adding the images or where the images are coming from. Still, however slowly or steadily, a stream of images is broadening to include Zumthor projects both well-known and less celebrated. It’s easy to browse the hundreds of images, but maybe frustrating to try and learn more about any particular one.

Alex

Electron Microscopy (Photography?) of Food

electron microscopy of food: Terra Cibus by Caren Alpert

electron microscopy of food: Terra Cibus by Caren Alpert

electron microscopy of food: Terra Cibus by Caren Alpert

electron microscopy of food: Terra Cibus by Caren Alpert

Above are stunning images of food stuffs taken by photographer Caren Alpert. Using a tool that most photographers are unfamiliar with, an electron microscope, Caren worked with technicians to obtain the images in her series Terra Cibus (etymology from Latin for “land” and “food”). Land and food are linked in ways that are obvious at scales we are used to. (EG: Why an American would eat so much beef: we have all that land, while a native of Japan might eat more seafood: they have all that ocean.) What’s surprising about Caren’s images (can we call microscopy photography?) is how similar some of these foodscapes are to much larger landscapes. In her own words: “I’ve made a living over the last decade capturing mostly recognizable images of food. Now I want to show what is there, but what we never actually see: landscapes, patterns and textures that ignite a completely different response from the viewer.” Can you guess the foods above?

Fun fact about how sensitive electron microscopes are: poorly placed elevators or air conditioners that cause even the slightest structural vibration can render them useless. I had always wondered where the colors in electron microscopy come from, but it turns out to be less scientific than I imagined. It turns out that Electron Microscopes produce only back and white images and the color is added through something like Photoshop.

For the curious, the foods above, on order, are: sugar, brussel sprouts, chocolate cake, and at the very bottom: table salt. This is the first time that images from electron microscopes have made me drool.

Alex

A Difference In Lighting: An Interview With Jon Setzen

A Difference In Lighting: An Interview With Jon Setzen

Today over on Los Angeles, I’m Yours, we have our Featured Interview with Media Temple’s Creative Director and Creative Mornings Los Angeles Organizer, Jon Setzen. We sat down with Jon in his studio, which he shares with his wife, artist Mindy Markowitz, in Silver Lake. He’s a recent LA transplant who has lived everywhere from San Francisco to London to Vancouver to, most recently, New York City. Our conversation revolves around music, design, and what makes Los Angeles city special to him.

You can read the full story here.

KYLE