Date Archives November 2011

Visions of Thanksgiving by Lisa Hanawalt

Visions of Thanksgiving by Lisa Hanawalt

Click image to enlarge

Thanksgiving is only a couple days away now, so I thought it would be quite appropriate to post this vision of Thanksgiving by Lisa Hanawalt. She’s taken the familiar Thanksgiving traditions and skewed them a bit (that’s probably an understatement). My favorite of the bunch is definitely ‘bottom turkey’, or using your unpaid bills as stuffing. I can only hope my Thanksgiving is half as entertaining.

Bobby

The playful illustrations (and plush dudes) of Jay Cover

The playful illustrations of Jay Cover

The playful illustrations of Jay Cover

The playful illustrations of Jay Cover

I feel like there’s a very distinct British style going around these days. This style is embodied by a looseness of stroke, a care-free attitude about what the person is creating. It’s not necessarily beautiful, but it’s certainly interesting and has a lot of character, which makes the work quite charming and enjoyable to look at. I’d definitely say that Jay Cover is a part of this British style.

His quirky and fun “dudes” at top were the first thing to grab my attention. I think they’re foxes, as he uses a lot of foxes in his work in general. I also liked his work revolving around funny statements like “Look for hidden gems”, which honestly sounds like something I might say myself. Finally, I thought his editorial work was also really strong, as you can see in the last image. His sense of color is spot on and it shows in that piece particularly well.

I’d suggest checking out not only his personal website, but his Flickr as well, where he has a lot more work at a larger size.

Bobby

Peter Jellitsch draws the wind

Peter Jellitsch STB series Wind Algorithm

Peter Jellitsch STB series Wind Algorithm

Peter Jellitsch STB series Wind Algorithm

Peter Jellitsch (kind of) draws the wind. Which is hard. Maybe you’ve seen pretty terrible representations of the wind in sections meant to illustrate cross-ventilation or in animations of how fans work, but these are better. What Jellitsch actually does is use wind analysis software to generates these fluid surfaces that he renders by hand. In his own words:

“‘The hand drawing’ is an essential part of my work. It allows me a physical acquisition of invisible digital calculatory work and includes, of course, mistakes and instinctive extension.”

What’s remarkable about these drawings, to me, is how such a simple drawing technique can achieve such visual depth. Essentially these drawings are a kind of hatching, but bear almost no resemblance to the hatching patterns that fill cross sections to delineate what is concrete or what is brick. This is the wind, and in tall buildings that use this kind of software analysis, the lateral forces from wind can become as important as gravity.

Alex

Time Twister – Hans Andersson’s LEGO Clock

Time Twister - Hans Andersson's LEGO Clock

Time Twister - Hans Andersson's LEGO Clock

I’ve a lot of love for LEGO, and so when I saw Swedish programmer Hans Andersson‘s Time Twister clock I just knew I’d have to share it. His creation is noisy, slow and indeed the epitome of chunkiness, and yet it’s a beautiful creation.

For me, the raw simplicity of Andersson’s design is really attractive and the way in which his creation goes about slowly-revealing each of it’s digits is almost hypnotic. When I watched the video above, showing his design in motion, I was shocked at how much anticipation and excitement I felt just simply watching the time being revealed.

Hans has also built some other amazing creation including two puzzle-solving robots which are pretty incredible. One can solve sudokus and an other one can solve a rubik’s cube. Both are well worth checking out.

Via Incredible Things

Philip

The Shrine / An Argument – A beautiful, new short from Sean Pecknold

As I was thinking of ways to write up this post, I couldn’t decide if this was a new music video for Fleet Foxes, or a piece of video art masterminded by Sean Pecknold. I think in fact, it’s a bit of both, but either way it’s something amazing.

The video was directed, animated and edited by Sean Pecknold, who we’ve featured on the site numerous times, who has to be one of my favorite creatives around these days. He has an really unique vision and creative output, and each time he gets better and better. The video utilizes the art of Stacey Rozich, a Seattle based illustrator and designer who’s work is used to perfection in this video. I was surprised to see Stacey’s work in the video, it’s so bold and graphic, but she seems tailor made for this project.

The Shrine / An Argument - A beautiful, new short from Sean Pecknold

The story in the video is… odd. I couldn’t tell you what it means, honestly. Maybe the deer is a bully and needs to stop being such an a-hole and killing things? I’m not sure, but it’s so well done, and the music is so good, that it really doesn’t matter to me.

I love that Robin Pecknold, the singer in Fleet Foxes, let his brother Sean go nuts with their videos, and clearly, it pays off. The video was released yesterday and it already has 85k pageviews. So when does Sean Pecknold move to become the next Spike Jonze or Michel Gondry? In my opinion, not soon enough.

The Shrine / An Argument - A beautiful, new short from Sean Pecknold

Director: Sean Pecknold
Animators: Sean Pecknold & Britta Johnson
Character Illustrations: Stacey Rozich
Art Assistant: Natalie Jenkins
Producer: Aaron Ball
Multiplane: Greg Pecknold
Post/Edit : Sean Pecknold
AE Assist: Austin Wilson
Sound FX: Shervin Shaeri

Jennifer Talesfore, winner of the Dracula Re-Covered Books Contest

Jennifer Talesfore, winner of the Dracula Re-Covered Books Contest

Choosing a winner for the Re-Covered Books contest becomes more difficult every time as the talent level continues to rise. Our last redesign contest was for the classic novel Dracula, where I asked potential creators to make something that steered away from the typical cliches, that felt like a new addition to the mythology of Count Dracula.

As I said, there were a ton of great entrants, but the one I was most mesmerized by was the entry above by Jennifer Talesfore. What I love about her design is how stark and graphic it is. She used a theme that was common amongst several of the designs, inverting the A’s in Dracula to represent fangs. Where I think her design differs and veers into brilliant is her treatment of the title. I see it two ways, the first being a hapless victim stuttering the name of Dracula, and the second being the way that Bela Lugosi may have intoned the word Dracula, sounding out certain parts longer than others. It’s funny that it also reads so well, despite looking so nonsensical.

She also did a nice job of presenting a cohesive thought, uniting the front, back and spine nicely. The book is told through a series of anecdotes from different characters, so the quote on the back is quite a nice touch.

Overall her entry feels like the complete package, and for that she deserves to be the winner. A huge thanks to Jennifer for entering, she’ll be receiving a $100 gift card to Amazon. Check back on Wednesday for a special edition of Re-Covered Books and the chance to win something extra special.

Bobby

Mikey Burton and Cranky Pressman team-up to make the best “business card” ever

Mikey Burton and Cranky Pressman team-up to make the best "business card" ever

Mikey Burton and Cranky Pressman team-up to make the best "business card" ever

I don’t know about you, but I find business cards pretty annoying. You spend a lot of money on them, making them beautiful and nice, only to jam them in your wallet or purse where they get scuffed and bent. For my past two business card orders I’ve used Moo’s Mini Cards, which are half the size of normal business cards and totally cheap. Now though, I think I’ve found an even better option.

Mikey Burton, with the help of Cranky Pressmen, have created a business card stamp that you can easily take along with you. The business card stamp was created for a Designer Challenge for Computer Arts Projects, much for the same reasons I outlined above. The stamp is called an Inspector Stamp, “a small, metal, self-inking stamp that comes on a keychain.” It has just the basics, his name and his website, because let’s get real, that’s all you need in this day and age. I’ve already contacted the guys at Cranky Pressman to get my own, I can’t wait to get a tiny fox to stamp on people.

You can read and see more about the project by clicking here.

Bobby

Clyfford Still Museum by Allied Works Architecture

Clyfford Still Museum by Allied Works Architecture

Clyfford Still Museum by Allied Works Architecture

Clyfford Still Museum by Allied Works Architecture

These are images of the recently completed Clyfford Still Museum designed by Allied Works Architecture. The building lives in downtown Denver, Colorado, sitting next to the pointy and shiny Denver Art Museum designed by Daniel Libeskind a few years back. That pointy building is all about metal: it exploits the structural properties of steel, is clad in aluminum and generally looks like an urban-scaled origami. The Clyfford Still Museum has steel it in, somewhere, but is more interested in the treatment of concrete that forms its surfaces. The outside is poured in a way that looks like tree bark, and by contrast the ceiling of the galleries on the upper floor is a concrete brise soleil that seems (at least in photos) more like a canopy of leaves than a massive shutter. If its neighbor is metal origami, then this museum does something different: it continues the grove of trees outside, but renders them in concrete. Maybe this makes the museum seem more rooted, or maybe the earthy color palette has the same effect.

Also, there are paintings inside.

Alex

The sincere and naive work of Pablo Boffelli

The naive and beautiful paintings of Pablo Boffelli

The naive and beautiful paintings of Pablo Boffelli

The naive and beautiful paintings of Pablo Boffelli

The naive and beautiful paintings of Pablo Boffelli

I’m pretty in love with the work of Pablo Boffelli because of how odd and interesting it is. It seems as though a lot of his work utilizes markers, or perhaps Photoshop, it’s sometimes hard to tell. Either way his pieces turn out extremely bright and colorful which is what I really appreciate about them. There’s a sense of pure joy of creation when he makes these, like he’s probably smiling the entire time he’s making these.

Bobby

‘Two Rings’ by Ice Choir

Ice Choir

Don’t ask me why, but there’s certainly an 80’s technopop revival going on, and let’s be honest, that’s no bad thing! Over the last few months this blog has featured tracks from the likes of Washed Out, Geoffrey O’Conner and College, each of whom have been channeling the 80’s in their own unique synth-inspired ways. Today I’d like to add the Brooklyn-four piece Ice Choir to that list and share with you their first single Two Rings which they released just last week.

Coming across like a mixture of New Order, Pet Shop Boys and Tears for Fears – Ice Choir is the personal project of The Pains of Being Pure at Heart member Kurt Feldman. Their track Two Rings features some sweet vocals and some terrific icy synths. It is the first single from their as-yet-untitled debut album which is due out next year. The single is available to buy as a limited-edition pressing here.

Philip