Date Archives October 2011

Ferris Plock breaks apart culture to create works of art

Ferris Plock breaks apart culture to create works of art

Ferris Plock breaks apart culture to create works of art

Ferris Plock breaks apart culture to create works of art

I posted about Ferris Plock a very long time ago, May 2007 to be specific, and it’s been pretty rad to see how he’s progressed over the years. His style these days incorporates a mish-mash of all kinds of cultures, 80’s cartoons represented in a (somewhat) traditional Japanese way. The intense amount of details is what really sells these for me, these pieces must take forever. The piece above in the middle is stunning, like something you’d see in a museum. Ferris was nice enough to send me some large sized images, so be sure to check out the gallery below and soak in some of his creative genius.

‘Everything We Miss’ by Luke Pearson

'Everything We Miss' by Luke Pearson

'Everything We Miss' by Luke Pearson

'Everything We Miss' by Luke Pearson

Here at The Fox Is Black we’re big fans of the work of Luke Pearson and although we’ve featured him a number of times before I couldn’t resist writing a small piece about his excellent book Everything We Miss. Published in June by the folks at Nobrow; the book is an atmospheric tale of heartbreak and longing. Told with a striking sense of poignancy and maturity, it also displays Pearson’s amazing visual talent and his skill at crafting a story through words and pictures. Below Luke describes the premise of the book:

Everything We Miss is a breakup story set against a darkly fantastical backdrop. A couple’s final moments together are documented alongside the events and strange occurrences that go on unseen and unheard around them (and around us).

The tone and atmosphere of the book is wonderfully captured through Luke’s drawings and his restrained palette of black, grey and orange strike the perfect balance between the magic and melancholy of the story. This book will easily strike a chord with anyone who’s found themselves in a relationship that’s become consumed by insecurities and resentments. And while the story may be emotionally complex, Luke handles it beautifully – capturing the poetic poignancy that can be found in the darker moments of our lives.

Everything We Miss is released through Nobrow and available to buy here.

Philip

The surreal photos and creations of Rafa Zubiria

The surreal photos and creations of Rafa Zubiria

The surreal photos and creations of Rafa Zubiria

The surreal photos and creations of Rafa Zubiria

The surreal photos and creations of Rafa Zubiria

Click images to enlarge

I haven’t really seen anything like the work of Rafa Zubiria’s before, a clever mix of photography and design as well as a lot of imagination. The photos you see above are from two different sets. The floating homes are from a series called No Way Home, while the animals are from Zooo (yes, that’s spelled correctly). What I love is that he clearly is skewing what you’d expect to see and giving us something fantastic instead. The images, especially the floating houses, seem so mundane and natural, like a flying house is a common occurrence. He’s got a ton of great work, I really can’t wait to see what he does in the future.

Found through Design Aside

Bobby

Thank You.

Thank You.

Last Monday I posted about my mom needing help, and I was amazed at the outpouring of kindness and generosity given by my friends and readers. I honestly wasn’t sure how it would turn out. Would people think I was using them? Would we not raise any money? Sunday night I didn’t sleep very well because I was thinking about it, but thankfully everything turned out alright. In all there were donations of a little over $2500, which is a huge, generous amount, and that was only Monday through Wednesday of last week. I decided Wednesday that what we raised was plenty, and that I didn’t want to ask anymore of anyone else. This is my big thank you to everyone who donated, who tweeted, who shared my message through Facebook or however… it certainly means a lot to me and my mother. I’ll post an update once we get her a car as well, which should be in the next week or so. Yet again, thank you all so very much, especially these people.

Ryan Coseboom, Grant Custer, Ronald Cox, Kate Bingaman Burt, Grigor Atanasov, Darin Cavallero, Matthew Scribner, J3 Productions, Inc, Eugen Sakhnenko, Emmy McHugh, Angelique Groh, Danny Magnino, John Stanbury, Tony Proud, Brook and Frances Shelley, Monique Proctor, Austin Radcliffe, Eric Hillerns, Jennifer Lorentzen, Lauren Fundora, Suzanne Smith, Laura Frame Illustration, Johannes Agerbo Haahr, Sean Percival, Aaron Garber, Adam Puncochar, Zach Bulick, Anthony Shiver, Matthew Herz, Dana Robinson, Grace Cooper, Rachel Yonda, Mason Plunkett, Norman Chan, JB Hartford, Keep Us Posted, Armando Godinez, Harpreet Padam, Sanya Obsivac, Michele Miller, Kristi Ryan, Mary Tamulis, Kimberly Linn, Nate Israel, Petra Wennberg Cesario, Eric Trine, Andrea Cheng, Eileen Tang, Felix Herzberg, Tobias Fonseca, Karen Owens, James Wright, Carrie Patterson, Kim Jae Seok, Michael Robbins, Grant Blakeman, Joe Van Wetering, Smoky’s Mom, Daniel Tjoelker, Nicole Reinertson, Arnór Bogason, Dan Matutina, Michael Duskus, Amy Stella, Jenny Carr, Hock Guan Song, Amanda and Jon Tobin (Amanda’s website), Vinciane dePape, Jennifer Talesfore, Julie Molloy, Kevin Dobson, KeFe, Brian Wade Scott, Fredrik Broman, Spit & Spite, Edlynne Laryea, Vincent Marjes, Sawyer DeVuyst, Karen Hiller, Alexandre Le Goff, Paul-Laurent Hughes, Haigen Pearson, Standard Motion, Scott Ogle, Matt Renskers, Robert Vidaure, Rebecca Cascio, Yu Hayakawa, Clinic Vitamins, Ian Bauer, Benjaman Horne, Lisa Krug

Bobby

Unofficial title sequence for ‘The Adventures of Tintin’ by James Curran

Unofficial title sequence for 'The Adventures of Tintin' by James Curran

Unofficial title sequence for 'The Adventures of Tintin' by James Curran

Unofficial title sequence for 'The Adventures of Tintin' by James Curran

Unofficial title sequence for 'The Adventures of Tintin' by James Curran

I’m pretty excited (but hesitant) for the upcoming Adventures of Tintin movie, as I think a lot of people are. James Curran though might be more excited than us all. He created this super rad, unofficial title sequence that utilizes themes and images from all 24 of the Tintin books, all blended together in one beautiful sequence. The fluidity and pace of this is great, it feels like you’re exploring Tintin’s entire life in just over a minute. Definitely be sure to check out the rest of his work on his portfolio as well, he’s doing some really great stuff.

Found through Drawn

Bobby

Restaurant 13, designed by Johan de Wachter Architects

Restaurant 13, designed by Johan de Wachter Architects

Restaurant 13, designed by Johan de Wachter Architects

Restaurant 13, designed by Johan de Wachter Architects

What would you expect from a restaurant built inside an architecture park? This particular restaurant is Restaurant 13, designed by Johan de Wachter which is located in the Jinhua Architecture Park. The park is a series of slightly bizarre structures designed by an international menagerie of architects selected by the park’s organizers: Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei. What’s remarkable about the restaurant, structurally, is the column grid that extends beyond the restaurant enclosure. What’s remarkable about the restaurant’s programming is the consideration for three different paces of dining: there’s a street food component for the fast folks, a sit-down restaurant for medium-paced food ingestion and a lounge restaurant for the slow folks. Overall, the layers of steel, glass, bamboo and dining speeds make this atypical restaurant well suited for an architecture park.

Alex

The Cinematic Orchestra brings new life to Entr’Acte

The Cinematic Orchestra brings new life to Entr'Acte

The Cinematic Orchestra brings new life to Entr'Acte

The Cinematic Orchestra brings new life to Entr'Acte

In 1924, a 26 year old French actor and aspiring director, Rene Clair, was given the opportunity to create a 20 minute short. Sandwiched in the intermission of a new ballet named Relâche, Clair’s debuting act as a filmmaker was presenting Dadaist cinema at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées. The resulting work, Entr’Acte, is one of the most ambitious debuts of any film maker I have ever seen. It is Dada absurdity at its best. In attempting to create new art devoid of war, common sense and apathy, Clair’s debut is a provoking examination of culture and societal culture.

Leave it to the Cinematic Orchestra to go back in time and throw a new musical veneer on a classic. This might be one of my favorite things the group has ever released. The original performance of Entr’Acte was silent. In his his understated and iconic style, Erik Satie wrote repetitive motifs to be repeated during the performance. In the process he created an early instance of film scoring, creating themes and loops to be embellished for affect. The Cinematic Orchestra does a great job not only reintroducing the film but staying true to both Clair and Satie’s goals. With a deft melodic touch, the film feels ripped into two parts. The first half rides strings on a loose time sequence to create an aura of ethereal indefiniteness. The second begins a revelatory examination of man’s actions and eventual disappearance through a driving, immaculate instrumental charge. These are a beautiful twenty minutes of film with an excellent score. But the final few minutes? Timeless.

You can buy this piece of music here.

Alec

‘What Do You Expect’ – The Music Of Change

Bob Dylan

2011 definitely feels like a time of change. From the demonstrations and protests that spread through Morocco, Egypt and Libya at the start of the year; to the riots in London and the the hundreds of global demonstrations taking place from Occupy Wall Street to the Spanish Indignants movement. Last Saturday Ann Powers of NPR’s The Record wrote an interesting piece asking “Will There Be Another Dylan?“; will there be a voice to emerge that will define this air of change and revolution?

Personally I would argue that music holds a different meaning for this generation compared with that of the ’60s. Even the way we listen to music has changed; he have easier access to it now and for many it’s become an endless way to create a backdrop to our their day. Indeed, I’m not the only one to notice this shift; Pulp’s frontman Jarvis Cocker noted the same, saying in yesterdays Guardian that “Music has changed. It’s not as central, it’s more like a scented candle”.

When Dylan sang that The Times They Are a-Changin’ in ’64, his song echoed the sentiment of the unvoiced mass public. Today, technology and the media have created plenty of new outlets for the public to voice their ideas and opinions. Now that the times are a-changed, it feels overly simplistic to picture that a song could be the best way to give a voice to an era of change.

One of the strongest voices to emerge from the pro-democracy demonstrations in Egypt at the start of the year was the Internet activist and computer engineer Wael Ghonim. It was Ghonim who used the term Revolution 2.0. For him, change came from the contribution of everyones voice. In his appearance on CBS’s 60 Minutes, he said that Egypt’s ‘revolution is like Wikipedia’. Ghonim saw change come about from everyone contributing small bits and pieces to the cause, and thus creating a single picture of the revolution. To this generation, another Dylan is not what we need.

That’s not to say that I feel music can’t play a role in change. Music is a wonderful way to bring people together and it can connect them. One only has to look at the drumming circles taking place during many of the ongoing demonstrations to see evidence of this. For me, music today seems to work best as a backdrop to change. The voices, ideas and words of a combined people should play a far more important role then that of a single voice.

In September, Swedish indie-pop singer/songwriter Sarah Assbring (aka El Perro Del Mar) released ‘What Do You Expect’, a track borne out of the flaring riots in the UK at the time. “I felt I needed to say something about the incidents” she said, “…I feel they speak volumes not only of one society in specific but about the society and time we live in at large.” For those familiar with Assbring’s music you’ll notice that ‘What Do You Expect’ is a marked change from her usual sound. Her sweet and melancholic vocals are all but removed from this track, leaving a dark and synth-heavy backdrop for a series of sound-bites taken straight from the streets. For Assbring it would seem that the voice of the people speak more then a single voice.

How about you? Do you think we need a Bob Dylan for this generation or have we reached a place where our united voices can stand as one?

Philip

Help Ink, helping charities with beautiful prints

Help Ink Poster - Skinny Ships

Help Ink Poster - Dustin Wallace

Help Ink Poster - Ed Nacional

Click images to enlarge

I was recently turned on to a new site called Help Ink, which gets great artists to contribute to create beautiful posters to help a variety of charities. You can choose from Charity: Water, Against Malaria, Plant with Purpose, Smile Train or Heifer, so there should be something that you’d like to help out with. As for the artists, the line-up so far is great. At the top of the post is my buddy Skinny Ships, with a super rad astronaut print, and after that is Dustin Wallace and Ed Nacional. They’ve created five prints in total so far and they’ve only just begun, so I’m excited to see who else they’ve got lined up for the future.

Bobby

Space Suit of the Week

Space Farm by NASA

Space Farm by NASA

Space Farm by NASA

Space Farm is one of the newest national public outreach projects undertaken by NASA this Autumn. Seven farms across the country are celebrating the history of the national space program by creating a corn maze that commemorates NASA’s achievements and progress in space. The mazes are created by The MAiZE, the largest cornfield maze consulting and design company.

I will admit that I am quite biased as I look forward to Fall all year round and thought that M. Night Shyamalan’s Signs was brilliant, but I personally believe this is one of the most spectacular ways of engaging the public in space exploration. By embracing the popular lure of paranormal crop circle creation, NASA has repainted the phenomenon to educate and inspire. When embracing the folklore of space exploration, its nice to know that we’re not alone out there.

For more information on participating farms, visit Space Farm 7.

Alana