Date Archives October 2011

What if normal people had super powers? The new movie ‘Chronicle’ is a good guess

What if normal people had super powers? The new movie 'Chronicle' is a good guess

What if normal people had super powers? The new movie 'Chronicle' is a good guess

For probably most of my life I’ve wondered what it would be like to have mutant powers. My intense imagination allowed me to imagine myself flying over buildings while I was sitting in the car, or throwing around objects simply by thinking about them. These days there are a lot of movies about such things, but most of them tend to fall short on the reality of situations like that, for example, dressing up in leather outfits and stopping the cuban missile crisis. That’s where the new film Chronicle comes in.

What I gathered from the trailer, the film is about three college bros who discover a mysterious something and gain special powers from it, one of which ends up turning bad. Watching the parts where they start using their powers though is awesome, and the idea that it’s like a muscle, the more you use it the stronger you are, is a great idea. They don’t really touch on concepts like that in the comic books, so it’s a fun detail. Hopefully it turns out as good as this trailer makes it look.

Bobby

‘Euphorie’, a brand new installation from Supakitch and Koralie

Euphorie, a brand new installation from Supakitch and Koralie

Euphorie, a brand new installation from Supakitch and Koralie

Euphorie, a brand new installation from Supakitch and Koralie

I can’t get enough of these recorded installation’s by Supakitch and Koralie, and thankfully they can’t stop making them. I’ve posted about two of their installations before, each of them are extremely beautiful and all made by hand with a lot of hard work, and this one is just as special. I really like how they’ve included the puffy, airbrushed clouds and creatures into the work, it brings an unique element that paint pens can’t quite make. Sit back and watch these masters do their thing.

Bobby

Prototypes and Moving Parts from the work of Tom Kundig

Kinetic Architecture by Olson Kundig Architects

Kinetic Architecture by Olson Kundig Architects

Two things I hand’t realized until now:
(1) Olson Kundig Architects posts videos to Vimeo and (2) how frequently the firm engineers dynamic enclosures into their work. It’s almost as it Reitveld never died, but instead moved to Seattle and fell in love with naturally-finished materials. It’s a bummer that this video doesn’t have any sound, either background music or explanations of the problems and solutions that these moving building giblets address (because it’s not apparent in every instance why things are moving or why they are moving as much as they are.) Still, it’s impressive to watch a wall or ceiling open; it’s a kind of dynamism that’s been a persistent vision of architects more often than it has been a reality in buildings. At least for the length of this mute video, we can see a few steel, glass, wood and concerete examples.

Alex.

Artist Retreat in Finland by 0 to 1

Artist Retreat in Finland by 0 to 1

Artist Retreat in Finland by 0 to 1

Artist Retreat in Finland by 0 to 1

Hovering over a particularly verdant parcel of land in Fiskars, Finland is this small Artist Retreat. Designed by O to 1, the petite program is clad in natural materials that do little to neutralize the project’s sharp design, at least for the time being. Eventually, the wooden bits will turn grey, better matching the metal skin and making the mass read more cohesively. Which isn’t meant to be a pointed criticism, I think this project is fantastic from its overall form all the way down to the exterior steps made from tree trunks. Of course, with a project this small there isn’t much else to talk about; how about that great paint job? It’d be nice to see an artist, or any other person, retreating inside this Artist Retreat to get a better sense of scale, but who wants their picture taken when they’re trying to get away?

Alex

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Dan Matutina

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Dan Matutina

Dan Matutina

In the three years I’ve been running The Desktop Wallpaper Project I’ve made a concerted effort to not use an artist more than once. This is only because I want to keep introducing new creatives, but there are times when I go back to someone who’s work I really enjoy. Dan Matutina is a perfect example of that. His previous wallpaper featured an epic battle between a pirate and a ninja, which is still one of my favorites. This time around we decided to collaborate a bit on the wallpaper.

Over the past few months I’ve become interested in the story of Urashima Taro. It’s about a young boy who helps a sea turtle who’s being harassed by a group of children. The next day a giant sea turtle rises up from the ocean to greet Urashima Taro, who unknowingly saved the daughter of the Emperor of the Sea, Ryojin, who wants to see him to thank him. Urashima Taro is brought to the bottom of the ocean where he meets the princess again, only this time she is a beautiful maiden. He stays for a few days but then wants to go home, as his mother is ill. The princess then gives him a mysterious box called tamatebako which will protect him from harm but which she tells him never to open. When he gets back to the surface nothing is the same, his mother and his village gone. It turns out that 300 years had passed while he was underwater, though it only felt like a few days. Distraught, he opens the box given to him by the princess, only to find that it contains his age, instantly becoming old and grayed. From the sea comes the sad, sweet voice of the princess: “I told you not to open that box. In it was your old age …”

I thought this would be fun to reinterpret a bit, instead saying that Urashima Tar? woke up in the distant future, filled with all kinds of fun sci-fi stuff. So Dan was awesome enough to take a stab at this, illustrating the point when Urashima Tar? returns to the surface, accidentally being caught the fishing captain. Here’s how describes it:

It’s Taro-san meeting the 3 futuristic fishermen. We see the fisherman on their hover dock. It’s like a normal dock with boosters. :D We see the Taro-san getting caught by the captain’s fishing line that’s why he surfaced.

I love it. I think Dan does amazing things with texture and color, he gives his work such life. There’s also a minimalism that really makes these work as desktop wallpapers. A huge thanks to Dan for hustling this wallpaper out to me quickly, I’m so happy with how it turned out.

Bobby

The bold and vibrant work of Sam Chivers

The bold and vibrant work of Sam Chivers

I’m pretty amazed by by the work of Sam Chivers, a UK illustrator who’s a genius at screen printing and collaging. What you see at top is some of his collage work, while the other two pieces are his screen printing work, all of them are astounding. It’s something in the way he layers colors, and the epic, cinematic feeling to his work that’s so groundbreaking. Perhaps Sam was a mathematician in his previous life? Or maybe he just understands the secrets of the universe so he jots them down into works of art. Either way I’m blown away by his work.

The bold and vibrant prints of Sam Chivers

The bold and vibrant prints of Sam Chivers

The crisp illustrations of Robert Samuel Hanson

The crisp illustrations of Robert Samuel Hanson

The crisp illustrations of Robert Samuel Hanson

The crisp illustrations of Robert Samuel Hanson

Last week the British-born/Berlin-based illustrator Robert Samuel Hanson launched a new site which boasts a whole host of new work. I’ve loved Robert’s style of illustration since seeing his work in Monocle a few years ago. Since then, he’s worked for a number of clients including the likes of The New York Times, Wired and The Economist.

His style is really sharp and simple, and I love how playful his images are. He creates illustrations which are smart, crisp and beautifully realized. His portfolio is filled with so many great pictures that it was a real task trying to pick a few to share with you for this post. Make sure to take a look for yourself and discover some wonderfully clever illustrations from a very talented chap!

Philip

Yohji Yamamoto and his avant garde spirit

Yohji Yamamoto and his avant garde spirit
Photo by Nicolas Guerin/Contour by Getty Images

I was reading an interview with Yohji Yamamoto over on the The Talks and found this particular part inspiring. Have you found something of your own?

I simply cannot stand people’s tendency to become conservative. There’s always a move back to established conventions, otherwise upcoming waves would be soon categorized as common sense. Even the term avant-garde – avant-garde is now just a tiny fashion category. It became so cheap and pretentious. I hate it. But still, I strongly believe in the avant-garde spirit: to voice opposition to traditional values. It is not just a youthful sentiment; I live my life by it. Rebellion. You will only be able to oppose something and find something of your own after traveling the long road of tradition.

Bobby

Creative people love the movie ‘Drive’

Drive Poster by Signal Noise

Earlier today I tweeted out to see if anyone had done any sort of interesting illustrations about the movie Drive, as I wanted an interesting image for the track I’m about to share with you. Unexpectedly, I received a ton of amazing illustrations and designs from all kinds of folks, so I thought I’d post share them with you all.

First things first, the song I was talking about.
The smarty music guy Harrison Mills, aka Catacombkid, sent me this track he made which is inspired by Drive, and I thought it was really great. It definitely feels like the vibe of the movie, electronic in nature with a bit of that 80’s vibe persisting through it. I could totally see myself driving late at night to this track, it’s a gem.

Now for the awesome art.
At the top of this post is a great poster designed by James White, aka Signal Noise, who did an amazing job. The colors, the mood, the lighting, the type – it all fits so perfectly. I especially love the light pouring out of his eye, reminiscent of when your eyes water when you’re going fast and headlights streaking in the night.

Mr. Hipp's poster for Drive

After that is Mr. Hipp’s album cover he created for the soundtrack. As with everyone else I know, the soundtrack is a big hit, so it totally makes sense why he’d create an homage. Love the colors and bold lines.

Jonny Negron Drive fanart

Here we have Jonny Negron’s fanart after he saw the film. I love the way he rendered the jacket, the details are really fantastic. This makes me want to read a manga series around Driver with Jonny drawing the whole thing, don’t you think that would be rad?

Little White Lies cover featuring Drive, art by Michael Gillette

Then we have the cover to the newest issue of Little White Lies, which is actually dedicated to Drive. It was created by Michael Gillette, who does a perfect job of rendering Mr. Gosling. Love the color palette as well.

Drive fanart by Louie Chin

This one is a nice piece done by New York based illustrator Louie Chin. I feel like Louie would do an amazing job coming up with character designs for an animated Drive series. I absolutely love his line work, it’s slightly messy and gritty, totally has the feeling of Drive all over it. Plus looks at Ryan Gosling’s face! He’s got the look of a calculated killing machine down pat.

Lisa Hanawalt's take on Drive

Last, but not least, is Lisa Hanawalt’s illustrations for her thoughts on Drive, which is probably one of the funniest things I’ve seen in a while. There are some spoilers in her breakdown, so you’ve been warned, but it’s totally worth it just to see this image with Ryan Gosling on a skateboard smoking a cigarette with a saxophone around him and parrot on his back. Yes, you read that right.

I have to give a big thanks to everyone who responded on Twitter, this was a fun post to write up. If you haven’t seen Drive yet, you clearly should.

Bobby