Date Archives August 2011

The Schwarzenegger Trilogy by Brainbow

The Schwarzenegger Trilogy by Brainbow

The Schwarzenegger Trilogy by Brainbow

The Schwarzenegger Trilogy by Brainbow

The guys at Brainbow are tearing it up with this new series of three shorts, all featuring out favorite Governator, Arnold Schwarzenegger. Each short is animated by hand with pen and highlighter, giving the videos a feeling like A-Ha’s Take On Me, but with more baddassery.

The first video ‘5 4 3 2…’ is a series of continuous hollywood explosions edited into a simple beat.

The second ‘Galleria’ is a cut from Terminator 2 which is one of my favorite scenes from any movie.

The third ‘come on… get down’ is a original gangsta rap with lyrics provided by Arnold himself and music created by Harry McGowan

I think they should make more of these starring other early 90’s movies stars. I guess this goes against what Kyle wrote the other day, mining the past to create something in the present, but maybe we just have to get over it and keep on making stuff?

Bobby

The Birth by Shoot Me Fashion

The Birth by Shoot Me Fashion

The Birth by Shoot Me Fashion

The Birth by Shoot Me Fashion

The Birth is a video by shoot me fashion that features exquisitely dressed models being birthed in mid-air… as if David Blaine were the delivering doctor. The pace and mood of the video are very well done. Using ribbons to replace all the gross stuff that also comes out when David Blaine isn’t delivering your full-grown-model/fetus is a pretty funny detail. I’d rather see ruffles than a placenta, but that’s just me. Now, let’s get these baby-sized-models something to eat.

Alex

Beautiful Moving Recipes by Tiger In A Jar

Beautiful Moving Recipes by Tiger In A Jar

Beautiful Moving Recipes by Tiger In A Jar

Beautiful Moving Recipes by Tiger In A Jar

Beautiful Moving Recipes by Tiger In A Jar

I guess I’m going to continue the theme of food posts a bit further with this two videos from husband and wife duo, Tiger In A Jar. I decided to title these videos ‘moving recipes’ because they’re more about the ingredients than some personality you’d see on a cooking show. This is leaving, breathing, moving, imperfect food porn at it’s best. Both of these recipes are rather unique as well, the top being a recipe for Ribboned Asparagus Salad and the bottom being Beet Cake. Sounds pretty good, right? Well, wait to watch these videos, that’s when you really start to drool.

Bobby

‘El Bulli: Cooking in Progress’

'El Bulli: Cooking in Progress'

'El Bulli: Cooking in Progress'

'El Bulli: Cooking in Progress'

'El Bulli: Cooking in Progress'

I might be in over my head a bit, but I love cooking and new ideas, so this is a no-brainer. The trailer above is for a new documentary profiling and examining Spanish chef Ferran Adriá and his restaurant El Bulli, arguably one of the best restaurants in the world. Adriá has been cooking at El Bulli since 1984 and was put in charge of the kitchen shortly thereafter in 1987. They became famous for their outlandish meals related to molecular gastronomy and their wait list, it was near impossible to get in. As it turns out, they’re going to be closing El Bulli down for two years in order to transform it into something else entirely.

“On July 30th 2011 elBulli will have completed its journey as a restaurant. We will transform into a creativity center, opening in 2014. Its main objective is to be a think-tank for creative cuisine and gastronomy and will be managed by a private foundation.”

The documentary will go behind-the-scenes of El Bulli and let you in on some of the magic, which is always fun to see. These chefs are like the NASA of cooking, making the craziest things imaginable like lobster foam or licakble wallpaper… ok, maybe that was another guy. They’re in the same ballpark!

Bobby

The Digest: Mignon LA

Mignon, Los Angeles

Mignon, Los Angeles

Mignon, Los Angeles

Here’s a challenge: Find a local liquor store in the United States without California wine. Ok, maybe if you went to a store that doesn’t sell wine, you’d win. But seriously. Check your local deli.

The great American viticulture and oenology explosion of the past half a century has brought an entire industry to the many fertile regions of California. It has been a magnificent success. An entire economy of wine bars span the nation, supporting the local growers who have achieved so much in such little time. The perk of our weakened economy means that Europe and Asia can drink California wine on the cheap. It’s a wonderful time for California wine drinkers, and the native drinkers are getting even younger.

But this article has nothing to do with California wine. I am rejecting the prominence, strengths and beauty in favor of the old, tried and true methods of Europe. Mignon LA does the same.

Started by two local LA boys, Mignon is their second venture. When owners Santos and Danny came together to start their first endeavor, Bacaro, there was a curious focus on Italian wines and food in the vein of an Italian tapas, if you will. And when they opened Mignon, California wines were simply taken off the menu. This is not from a foolhardy position: having worked in local wine stores and traveled the globe extensively, the owners were deliberate in their choices.

Deliberation, in this case, meant success. Mignon claims to be a wine and cheese bar but I have found plenty more in it than that. Located in one of the revitalized corridors of downtown LA (6th and Main) that I affectionately refer to as “booze alley,” it is the only place to get a great glass of vino in the neighborhood. Tucking you around a bar with food and drink being served from the center outwards, it is cozy and inviting. Clever and comfortable decor (mens ties painted onto the walls, hangers for chandeliers) keep it informal, with the friendly and knowledgeable staff willing to not only elucidate your journey into Old World wines but navigate it as well.

Reward is in the pairing of wines to traditional yet robustly flavored tapas. Italian wines dominate the menu and on this particular night I was recommended the Etna Rosso. This Sicilian red is drawn from the volcanic slopes of Mt. Etna, bringing in a whole different meaning to the word “earthy.” The alcohol hid under a fruity nose and I was drawn into its strawberry, possibly peach like essence. Soon after I found myself drizzling sage honey onto slices of pecorino, following it with the smallest of sips to complete a triptych of flavor. A plate filled with jamon serrano, barolo, mortadella and salame kept my palate on its toes. While a smattering of cheese and charcuterie is perfect, the menu’s traditional focus allows me to enjoy dishes I would be too shy to order outside of Europe. Pate? Yes please. Brie tartine with fig jam and a glass of rosé? Say no more! You mean I’ll get bechamel with that croque monsieur? Now you’re embarassing me. I’ll take two.

This reverence of an intimate, rustic wine bar makes Mignon a find in the city. You can get great California wines anywhere in California. But Old World? Look no further than the heart of downtown LA.

Mignon LA
128 E Sixth St, Los Angeles, CA.

Alec

Sights & Sounds: Animal Collective / ‘Sung Tongs’ by Andy Mangold

Sights & Sounds: Animal Collective / 'Sung Tongs' by Andy Mangold

Andy Mangold

I’m super excited this morning because we’ve finally reached Sung Tongs, one of my favorite records and a place where I think most Animal Collective fans start their collections. At this point they had recorded 3 albums in two years, although this album was recorded only by Avey Tare and Panda Bear. To me, Sung Tongs feels like they finally felt comfortable with the music they were making, like they really started to understand just what they were doing.

Some of the songs on this album are some of my favorites of theirs overall. I’ve posted Kids on Holiday above as the sample because it’s possibly one of my favorite Animal Collective songs. There’s a pace and rhythm to this song that’s unlike any I’ve ever heard, it’s hypnotic. Then you have songs like Winter’s Love, which I would personally describe as a beautiful track. Split in two, the beginning melody acts as a prelude to what’s to come. Even the 12:37 song Visiting Friends is beautiful, a slow hush of guitars over a trickle of random-seeming, ambient sounds.

As for the wallpaper today, I can’t think of anyone better to interpret this then the curator of this series, Andy Mangold. Andy has such a vibrancy to his design style, all of his work feels so crisp and perfect. He’s also a master of all mediums, doing everything from posters, branding, package design, even a wood block calendar with custom designed numerals.

With Andy’s wallpaper for Sung Tongs I feel like he’s totally captured the energy and beauty of the album. I think if someone didn’t know better they’d think this was the real album cover. It’s colorful without being jarring and there’s lots of room for your icons, for Mac or Windows kids. Here’s what he had to say about his wallpaper.

Sung Tongs feels very childish to me, in a good way. There is an immaturity and naivete that gives the whole album an air of authenticity and rawness. The image of the children playing on the jungle-gym is how I choose to imagine David and Noah creating the album, experimenting, probing, exploring, and above all else, laughing.

The diversity of sounds and sonic textures is staggering, especially considering it was all created by only two people. I tried to represent this variation visually with the spectrum of colored, textured bars layered over the imagery.

A very big thanks to Andy for not only this beautiful wallpaper but for curating so many amazing artists. The talented folks chosen have made some of the best wallpapers out there, and I owe him a lot. Thanks Andy! Check back next week when we explore Feels.

Day-After-Day in NOD by Andy J. Miller

Day-After-Day in NOD by Andy J. Miller
Day-After-Day in NOD by Andy J. Miller
Day-After-Day in NOD by Andy J. Miller

Andy J. Miller never seems to stop working. Honestly. Since April he’s been working on a really nice project set in the land of NOD; a dream-like world filled with many weird and wonderful creatures. Every weekday he introduces a new one, which as he puts it, will “slip, putter, or swagger out of the darkness”. With more then 80 NOD inhabitants already on display, NOD already seems to be a busy place.

Miller say’s that he’s got all kinds of ideas for where this project could go, but for now it seems pretty great as it is. It’s particularly exciting to see the variety of ideas that Andy has and the amount of fun he seems to have creating these characters. The plan is to run the project for a year and finish with a total of 260 characters (I’m not sure if they’re called NODletes or NODites or NODs, so we’ll stick with characters!).

You can view the ongoing work on the Day-After-Day blog, and if you use tumblr make sure to subscribe to the page and discover more about the NOD universe everyday.

Philip

Rafael Viñoly Designs The Set of ‘Die Liebe der Danae’

Rafael Vinoly's set for die liebe der danae

Rafael Vinoly's set for die liebe der danae

Rafael Vinoly's set for die liebe der danae

First, a confession. Whenever I see a play, band or musical – any kind of performance – I tend to pay as much attention to the technical aspects of the show as the people on stage making noise. There’s something that can be magical about a well-done production; even though I can understand the mechanisms that are contributing to some particular effect, it can still be effective in ways that baffle me. So it’s with particular interest that I read about this recent set design completed by Rafael Vinoly for the opera Die Liebe der Danae.

The set looks moody and abstract in a way that I really enjoy. In talking about working on set design, Vinoly says this about architects.

“Architects feel empowered to give opinions about politics and sociology and philosophy without knowing much about it. […] Kind of in the same way that they think they can design furniture or fashion or utensils for dining. I think architects tend to believe that they can almost do anything, which is a wonderful characteristic, but in some cases you just fall flat. Theatrical design is just a completely different vocabulary. It’s a very, very difficult thing to do well.”

I can’t decide if I agree with him or not. There have been some pretty, albeit dysfunctional, designs coming from the hands and offices of architects. The effort to work in another area isn’t the problem though, it’s the attitude. What Vinoly seems to be saying is that architects need to take their efforts more seriously when they dabble outside of buildings. His dabbling looks great and seriously well-done.

Alex

‘You Are All I See’ by Active Child

You Are All I See by Active Child

Active Child

A few months ago I randomly decided to attend a party at the Penguin store that Fader Magazine was throwing (I didn’t honestly realize they were still around). I went for two reasons: Kisses was DJing and Active Child was performing live. If you’re not familiar with Active Child, it’s time you do yourself a favor and start listening to them. Basically the brainchild of Pat Grossi, he’s kind of a mix of James Blake, Sufjan Stevens and Joanna Newsome. Getting curious?

He has a new album coming out on August 23 called You Are All I See, and you can preview the entire thing thanks to the folks at Hype Machine. I’ve been listening to the album pretty non-stop for the last few days and I think it’s amazing. He’s also especially amazing when he plays live with his band. There are some pre-recorded beats which a drummer, guitar player play along with, while Pat himself plays harp the entire time while singing. It’s phenomenal. Definitely take a listen to the album above, pre-order his album and catch him live if you get a chance.

Bobby

Ori Toor’s Animated Video for Panda Bear’s ‘Alsatian Darn’

Ori Toor's Animated Video for Panda Bear's 'Alsatian Darn'

Ori Toor's Animated Video for Panda Bear's 'Alsatian Darn'

Ori Toor's Animated Video for Panda Bear's 'Alsatian Darn'

The screenshots above do no justice to this fan made music video by Tel-Aviv creative Ori Toor. The video was sparked by Ori’s love of the Panda Bear song Alsatian Darn, off of Panda Bear’s newest album Tomboy. The animation was created through “layering frame by frame loops together in different ways”, thus giving the video this random but flowing imagery that draws you in and keeps your eyes busy. The random, pulsing shapes flow in and out of each other, mimicking the sounds of the song near perfectly. They even look tiny creatures or micro-organisms sometimes. Take 5 minutes and watch the full thing, it’s simple beautiful.

Bobby