Date Archives August 2011

Diego Guevara Architecture Photography

Diego Guevara Architectural Photography

Diego Guevara Architectural Photography

Diego Guevara Architectural Photography

While wandering around Behance this weekend, I came across these symmetrical photos from Diego Guevara. The photo series is a personal project of Diego’s that combines his love of photography, architecture and design. I don’t think we can really call them abstract (because they’re literally concrete) but they aren’t entirely real, either. Cut, copied, corrected and cropped into pristine and light mirror images, the reality of concrete and brick becomes obscured. Most of the photos (if not all) in the series originated with buildings in Miami, although I don’t recognize any specific building.

Do you have any idea what these buildings are from?

Alex

Chris Labrooy Turns Architecture Into Typography

Chris Labrooy Turns Architecture Into Typography

Chris Labrooy Turns Architecture Into Typography

Chris Labrooy Turns Architecture Into Typography

Chris Labrooy Turns Architecture Into Typography

Inspiration comes in many forms, and for UK designer/illustrator Chris Labrooy his came quite literally. Drawing from the works of some of the most famous architects out there, Chris has created these beautiful, 3D typefaces which spell out the architects name using some of their most famous creations as the foundations. What you see above are Tadao Ando, Zaha Hadid, Oscar Niemeyer and Toyo Ito, all of which I thought were quite impressive. Some pieces, like the Zaha Hadid one, were based more on her formal language, rather than a particular building, whereas the Tadao Ando one is very much created from the visual language of his structures.

If you dig these imagers I’d suggest visiting each of the projects on his site where you can see a bunch of behind-the-scenes pre vis stuff as well as some sketches that helped him figure out these pieces. He has also a bunch of other great work in his portfolio, I’d highly suggest taking some time to check it out.

Bobby

James Blake & Bon Iver Collaborate On A New Track Called ‘Fall Creek Boys Choir’

James Blake & Bon Iver Collaborate On A New Track Called 'Fall Creek Boys Choir'

Last week, pretty much out of nowhere, James Blake dropped a brand new track called Fall Creek Boys Choir, which is a collaboration between himself and Bon Iver. The song is beautiful blend of their unique styles, the vocals handled by Justin Vernon and I’m guessing James Blake handled the production side of things. It definitely has some of that cheesy 80’s vibe that Justin Vernon is all about, but then there’s the spooky electronic side which is mostly James Blake, though Justin did dabble in that stuff with Volcano Choir.

It’s also interesting to note that at the bottom of the video info on YouTube (where the track was posted to) it says “Enough Thunder – Oct 2011”, which could potentially mean there’s a new EP or album coming out. Looking forward to hearing more from Blake or more collaborations between the two of them.

Bobby

‘Indian Summer (Des Moines)’ by Canon Blue

Photo of Canon Blue by Thomas Husmer

Rumspringa by Canon Blue

Last March I wrote a post about the musician Daniel James and his musical project Canon Blue. A few years ago I had stumbled upon his debut album Colonies and it has slowly became one of my favorite albums of the last few years. Since its release nearly four years ago James has been keeping busy by spending much of his time playing with bands such as Efterklang and Foster The People and it was during his off-hour times on tour with Efterklang that he wrote his follow-up album Rumspringa.

Released today through Efterklang’s own label Rumraket, this will regrettably be the labels final release but as swan songs go Rumspringa has all the makings of being a tremendous curtain call for the small Danish label. Above you can listen to the album’s first single Indian Summer which is a truly infectious track full of fun and playfulness. The label describes the album as a “tour de force” and pitches it as something that fans of Sufjan Stevens, Efterklang, Jeff Buckley & Steve Reich will enjoy. I know for sure that I’ll be buying my copy today and I’ll be making the extra effort to get a hardcopy solely for the beautiful artwork created by the Danish-duo Hvass & Hannibal that adorns the cover. You probably should too – if it’s even slightly as good as Colonies is then I can guarantee that you won’t be disappointed!

Philip

Space Oddity, The Book by Andrew Kolb

Space Oddity, The Book by Andrew Kolb

Space Oddity, The Book by Andrew Kolb

Space Oddity, The Book by Andrew Kolb

Space Oddity, The Book by Andrew Kolb

Funny enough, Alex has started moving away from the Spacesuit of the Week a bit and then I run into a funny little spacesuit related gem. It’s a book from Andrew Kolb, which is basically a children’s books adaptation of David Bowie’s song, Space Oddity. It’s a great song filled with wild imagery, and Andrew’s interpretation is spot on. The story has sort of a 2001 kind of vibe, but mixed with something you may have seen a in a Golden Book story from long ago. I think it’s a real crime that this isn’t published yet, what parent wouldn’t buy this for their kid?

P.S. You may have seen Andrew’s work on the site before, he did this beautiful poster inspired by The Walking Dead television show.

Bobby

Branding 10,000 Lakes by Nicole Meyer

Branding 10,000 Lakes by Nicole Meyer

Branding 10,000 Lakes by Nicole Meyer

Branding 10,000 Lakes by Nicole Meyer

Branding 10,000 Lakes by Nicole Meyer

Click images to enlarge

Lake logos have a tendency to be, well, fairly ugly. This project was created to rethink what they could be.

One Minnesota Lake. One Logo. Everyday.

That’s the straightforward description of Branding 10,000 Lakes, an ongoing project from Nicole Meyer. It’s an ambitious project, it would take about 27 years to complete all of them, but that’s the fun of it. I love that there’s a pretty wide range of styles happening, but they also feel pretty cohesive because they’re all done by Nicole’s able hands. It’s not only a fun experiment to watch, but I feel like this is a great way to keep your creative muscle flexed, kind of like Make Something Cool Everyday.

Click here to check out the rest of the Lakes.

Bobby

Space Thing of the Week

Devour by Christoper Jonassen

Devour by Christoper Jonassen

Devour by Christoper Jonassen

These aren’t three of the sixty-something moons of Saturn; instead, they are beautiful photographs of frying pans in a series called Devour by Norwegian photographer Christoper Jonassen. Like moons characterized by the “wear and tear” they encounter looping around in space, cookware is marked by its encounters with heating cycles and the occasional scour pad. Floating in dark space, each of these round, metallic landscapes is curious, as in “What has this poor pan been through?” On the other hand, what has poor Pandora been through? It looks more like a dusty potato than celestial orb.

But no potatoes here, anymore; no cheese, either. The only space trick they have left when they’re thrown away and, for a brief second, are flying saucers.

Alex

Peter Blake For Fred Perry By Hint

Peter Blake For Fred Perry By Hint

Peter Blake For Fred Perry By Hint

Peter Blake For Fred Perry By Hint

We live in a very interesting time where art and fashion are colliding to create some really stupid and some really interesting things. Yet, one era of art that is constantly getting beat down by its own nature is Pop Art. Low brow fashion retailers like Forever 21, H&M, and Urban Outfitters are constantly recycling the catalogues and concepts of Warhol and Lichtenstein for new t-shirt material, bringing nothing new to either the clothing nor the art beyond creating a bastardized cheap product.

Thankfully, people have stepped in to rectify what is happening to Pop Art and have even created new collisions with fashion and art. UK based fashion retailer Fred Perry has collaborated with living British Pop Artist legend, Peter Blake. Together they have have created a little collaboration entitled Blank Canvas, which ties Blake’s aesthetic with Perry’s rich polos as the “blank canvas.”

In the above video, Hint sits down with Blake himself to speak about Pop Art and its influence on fashion (particularly, British fashion). Blake has some really remarkable things to say, explaining his intention behind a lot of his imagery (the target being commentary on Jasper Johns’ Target), the Mod movement and its relationship to fashion, his work as an artist (and current work!), and how he has contributed to Pop Art. Blake is a fascinating man and is remarkably sharp and busy for a near octogenarian.

Although I must say the clothing coming out of the collaboration are not mind-blowing, they really are a great representative of Blake and Perry, two creators who have a distinct voice in the visual world. Take a minute and watch this interview with Blake and, by all means, pass it around to anyone who may in fact be bastardizing his visual lexicon for cheap fashion hounds.

KYLE

Lego Volkswagen T1 Camper Van

Lego VW

“For Pete’s sake, what are you writing about Lego for?”. If this is your reaction to seeing this post, then move on, keep moving and perhaps think about what you just said. It might mean that we may need to rethink our friendship – I’m sorry but that’s just how it goes!

Lego VW

Seriously though, I find it hard to imagine any reader here who doesn’t take a liking to the wonderful world of Lego. In truth, it’s probably the greatest toy ever made. The other day Lego announced that they’d collaborated with Volkswagen to create a Lego T1 Camper Van and I think they did an incredible job in recreating such an iconic design. While Lego have really captured the essence of the van it’s the enthusiasm of designer John-Henry Harris seen in the video above that made me want to share this with you.

For many, working as a Concept Designer at LEGO seems like a dream-job and it’s enriching to see the enthusiasm that Harris has for his craft. If you’re interested in learning more about the role of play in design then I recommend you check out this excellent TEDxEast talk in which Harris discusses how play is an integral part of any design process. The Camper van itself, will be available October 1, 2011 from the online Lego shop.

The Stanley Parable

Storytelling has always been a fascination of mine. It seems to permeate almost every article I write. The storyteller is dependent on diction and dialog to make the tale come to life for the listener and reader. Legends and tall tales from oral histories eventually were written into tomes, venerated for their information and their sacredness. Commercial publishing came next, then the movies, television, and now the multiple forms of interactive media. After years of innovation and tempered expectations, we have outgrown paper.

In many ways, the past forty years of the digital era mirror the evolution of storytelling: it’s all about user interfaces. So to some extent, the Stanley Parable is best experienced without any introduction. Except, maybe, the trailer above. Don’t watch the second video unless you want to experience the game with a blank slate. The second video is just one of the seven possible outcomes. The game can be downloaded for both mac and PC in the above link for free. It’s worth the download just for the existential sky dive the game will put in your mind. This is a video game without a weapon. Your biggest enemy is the narrator. Victory is impossible. The decisions are simple. You can do whatever you want… or can you?

Created in Los Angeles by 22 year old Davey Wreden, the game attacks traditional conceptions of storytelling. For example, a novel may have thousands of choices that characters make. But in most cases, the story comes down to one decision to turn the tale. The Stanley Parable grants several choices but tons of decisions. It touches on that gap between free will and determinism. Or, possibly more confusing, examines what in life is predestined against that which exists in the temporal indefiniteness of right now. There is a beginning and an end for sure… but what happens in the middle?

It’s sad, I know. All stories must come to an end. But you can get something out of this one.

Alec