Date Archives May 2011

World Premiere of Alex Stapleton’s ‘OUTSIDE IN: The Story of Art in the Streets’

Shepard Fairey Spinning at the premiere of Alex Stapleton’s 'OUTSIDE IN: The Story of Art in the Streets'

The Premiere of Alex Stapleton’s 'OUTSIDE IN: The Story of Art in the Streets'

'OUTSIDE IN: Art In The Streets' Film Premiere'

OUTSIDE IN: The Story of Art in the Streets is a great glimpse into the making of the current MOCA exhibit. When I saw the footage of Barry McGee and Stephen Powers painting and putting together their incredible installation at the museum I gained a whole new level of respect for them, especially since they created a majority of the pieces at the location. Swoon did the same thing with her team and it was awesome to see them on the ground with X-Acto blades.

The director even managed to interview REVOK before he was arrested for vandalism back in April. He’s now serving 120 days in jail with a $320,000 bail, an amount SABER pointed out as “over $100,000 more than OJ Simpson’s, and OJ was on trial for murder”. So, it was no surprise that the MSK crew were yelling at the screen whenever LAPD officers appeared on screen. In a candid moment towards the end of the film, Shepard Fairey talks about his family and what they think of his graffiti “My daughter knows to only talk to the police if she’s in trouble…not when when she’s putting up stickers”, an act that Shepard may or may not have perpetrated on the stalls of the men’s bathroom.

When the last credit rolled, Jonathan Wells, Programming Director of Levi’s Film Workshop and Executive Producer of the film, invited SABER, Mr. Cartoon, C.R. Stecyk III, Shepard Fairey, Patti Astor, Alex Stapleton, Neckface and exhibit curators Aaron Rose, Roger Gastman and Ethel Seno to come onstage for a Q&A. There was an awkward silence as the crowd built up enough courage to start asking questions like “Where do you get your paint from” to which Neckface replied “I started out stealing my shit…and I still steal my shit” – making us bust up laughing.

“I understand why people get frustrated by graffiti…If I caught some kid tagging my fence I’d knock him out, but if I didn’t catch him, I’d cross his name out first before I buffed it.” – Mr. Cartoon

By the end of the night we had met all of our rebel heroes, heard Shepard Fairey dj a set of punk and hip-hop, and had gotten a better perspective of all the hard work that went into putting Art in the Streets together.

A big thanks to the Levi’s Workshop for inviting us, and a congrats for making all of this happen. ALl of the videos were created at the Levi’s Workshop in the MOCA, where you can make videos or rent cameras for your own projects.

Daniel

Stussy x Marvel

David Shrigley's Hulk for Stussy x Marvel
John K's Crystal & Johnny Strange for Stussy x MarvelTodd James (AKA REAS)'s She-Hulk for Stussy x Marvel

I’m a little late on this but recently the Californian based clothing brand Stussy joined forces with both Marvel Comics and a group of artists to create a series of special edition t-shirts. This is the second series in their Stussy x Marvel range and this one is particularly great because of the talent that they’ve been able to attract. Above you can see some good examples of the kind of thing to expect from the series, with each superhero being re-imagined in the artist’s signature style. Above, you caught David Shrigley’s Incredible Hulk, Ren and Stimpy creator John K’s take on Crystal and Johnny Storm, and Todd James’s She-Hulk. They’re pretty crazy but I think they’re really great.

The talent doesn’t end just there either, check out their site and you’ll see people like the LA tattoo artist Mr. Cartoon, the American animator Bill Plympton and British illustrator Will Sweeney have all contributed designs for the project. I think my personal favorite might be James Jarvis’ take on The Thing which just has so much character. If you’re interested in finding out more about the project I’ve included a little video below the cut which was made by the guys at HBTV. It’s fairly typical marketing schtick but it’s worth the watch to see plenty of the artists speaking about the influences that Marvel has brought upon them and you’ll also catch Mr. Cartoon do a sweet little rendition of the Spiderman theme!

Philip
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The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Yours, Roxanne

Yours, Roxanne

It’s already Wednesday, we’ve hit the halfway point and you deserve some new art to grace your monitor. Thankfully, Roxanne Daner, better known as Yours, Roxanne, has you covered. Roxanne lives and works here in Los Angeles and her style is totally fun with lots of great textures and tones. I feel like her desktop wallpaper is what’s going on behind the scenes of Dan Cassaro’s wallpaper, and that’s partly why I love it. In her own words, “I called it Hard Drive and well… it illustrates whats going on inside your computer to keep everything running smoothly.” I would certainly hope that a gnome, a dog, a bird and a rabbit are doing a good job making my computer keep ticking. Beautiful work, Roxanne!

Bobby

Renée Rossouw’s Pattern Diary, An Artistic Investigation

Renée Rossouw's Pattern Diary

Renée Rossouw's Pattern Diary

Renée Rossouw's Pattern Diary

Renée Rossouw's Pattern Diary

Renée Rossouw is a young designer from Cape Town who has recently completed a cool, interdisciplinary project that ties in writing, pattern making, and ceramics. The result is Pattern Diary, where Rossouw hand painted patterns inspired by her 2010 diary entries on to vases. The result is a collection of many unique, different ceramics, all hand painted, all different, but all working well together as a set. A collaboration with Italy’s Bosa Cermaiche, the pieces all compliment each other, all using a similar visual vocabulary to express very, very different abstract ideas: one vase may have a pattern that resembles suspended bricks, while another may represent a night’s sky or part of a vehicle. The white base of the ceramics, the use of only reds and blues, and Rossouw’s strong style provide for any one piece to stand alone quite nicely or with one or two other vase buddies to form a crew.

Each piece is a different thought, but are obviously from the same thinker. Pattern Diary is a clever and beautiful means of expression that ties so much together, from telling the story of an artist’s personal journey to providing a new outlet for visual illustration.

Found through Yatzer

KYLE

Luke Pearson

Luke Pearson

Luke Pearson

Luke Pearson

Click images to enlarge

I first wrote about Luke Pearson about two years ago when Luke Pearson“>he won the Holiday Wallpaper Competition with his hysterically frantic illustration. He’s been pretty dang busy since then, doing a lot of work with the folks over at Nobrow, including a new 24 page comic which he just finished called Hildafolk. What I love about Luke’s work is his detailed line work and this sense of fun and energy that comes out of each of his pieces. Even these illustrations he did for Little White Lies magazine, although more straightforward, have this playfulness to them that really catch my eye.

Definitely take a few minutes and check out the rest of his profile by clicking here.

Bobby

Innovation Via Iteration: Yves Behar’s Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

Yves Behar's Process In Making the SAYL Chair

As of lately I’ve been really curious about people’s process when it comes to creation. I try to post about it often because I think there’s a value in learning from how people do the things they do. So I was really inspired when I saw these photos of Yves Behar and his team working on the SAYL chair for Herman Miller. His motivation was simple:

“How do we create a task chair that is attainable? Can we make a comfortable, supportive, healthy, and beautiful chair at a lower price point?”

As for his inspiration, he looked to the Golden Gate bridge, probably the most famous suspension bridge in the world and it’s ability to support so much weight with so little. And I think that’s what’s so interesting about this chair, is that Yves and his team were trying to create something that was basically nothing. It’s honestly the bare bones of what a chair should be. I also enjoy the fact that they tried building this chair in so many different ways. There’s that quote by Benjamin Franklin which says, “I didn’t fail the test, I just found 100 ways to do it wrong,” which I thought was quite apropos.

There are lots more photos under the cut, be sure to check them all out.

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A Multi-Hued, Multi-Faceted Treehugger Pavilion by One Fine Day Architecture

Treehugger Pavilion by One Fine Day Architecture

Treehugger Pavilion by One Fine Day Architecture

Treehugger Pavilion by One Fine Day Architecture

Have you ever seen an enthusiastic child hug a cat? They will squeeze and squeeze until the cat gets annoyed and scampers away. The Treehugger Pavilion reminded me of such enthusiasm.

This pentagonal pavilion was built surrounding a tree for the National Garden Show in Koblenz, Germany, and I think the form of the supports and the color-changing ceiling are all very exciting. That said, I think the central tree is a little lost in all of this architectural enthusiasm. It’s always a very real possibility that photographs just don’t convey the space similar to how it is actually experienced; for instance, would you guess that the floor plan of this structure was square, or pentagonal? The tree trunk seems nearly strangled at the floor and ceiling, but maybe the transition is just too abrupt for me. From the inside of the pavilion, the canopy of the tree is abstracted as a geometric array of back-lit LED panels. In short, I can’t decide what this project is about: the tree or the pavilion that hugs it?

For more photos and information, click here.

Alex

‘Speaking In Tongues’ and ‘Culture War’, Two New Tracks from Arcade Fire

Arcade Fire by Anton Corbijn

Out of nowhere two new Arcade Fire tracks were dropped on the world, both premiered in the U.K. on the Zane Lowe show. The songs were ripped from his radio show, so the quality isn’t the greatest, but they still sound pretty great in the artistic sense. Supposedly these songs will be released on a deluxe version of The Suburbs and maybe included in the Spike Jones directed short film Scenes From The Suburbs.

The first song is called Speaking In Tongues and features some minor vocals from David Byrne and the second is called Culture War. I prefer Speaking In Tongues over Culture War, but they’re both pretty nice and definitely fit into the vibe of the other songs from The Suburbs. Props to ListenBeforeYouBuy for ripping these tracks and making them available to everyone.

Bobby

The Natural Speaker by Studio Joon&Jung

The Natural Speaker by Studio Joon&Jung

The Natural Speaker by Studio Joon&Jung

The Natural Speaker by Studio Joon&Jung

My current sound system set-up at home is a set of Joey Roth ceramic speakers, which in my opinion are some of the most beautiful objects ever created. Simple in form and materials, they sound amazing, and of course they look amazing. But the folks over at Studio Joon&Jung have thrown in their hat and have created a set of speakers that are rustic and charming because of their handmade characteristics. Says their website:

The idea for the ‘the natural speaker’ derived from the desire to create an absolutely unique, handcrafted speaker for the interior space. Whereas a lot of speakers are constructed to produce a rather fat bass and sharp high tones, we felt the sound was kind of stuck inside the speakers, missing a natural vibe and ambiance. During the development of the ‘the natural speaker’ we discovered the great properties of porcelain as a speaker casing, providing a clear resonance and mellow sound.

Amplified inside the ceramic and wood transmission construction, the sound gains a slight echo, creating a natural feeling of resonance, resembling the distinct flair of an acoustic instrument right in front of you.

I think my favorite details on the speakers are the small, leather straps that keep the wood and the ceramic firmly held together. It’s a detail that could have been overlooked but was well considered. I’m so curious to know how they sound in person. Speakers are so subjective to an individual listener, but they seem to be really well crafted. If you’d like more info and photos on the Natural Speakers click here.

Found through Dezeen

Bobby

Museum Aan de Stroom by Neutelngs Riedijk

Museum Aan de Stroom by Neutelngs Riedijk

Museum Aan de Stroom by Neutelngs Riedijk

This is new old news, or almost news that has been in hibernation. (Did you know that if this building were in Canada, it would still be in hibernation?) But this building, a public museum, is in Antwerp and actually about the history of Antwerp: “Visitors will discover how Antwerp and the world have been indisputably linked with one another for hundreds of years.” For the past one year, the finished building has been closed to the public while artifacts slowly migrated into the museum. And now, it’s ready to open.

I’m a huge fan of the architects, Neutelings Riedijk because their projects are distinctive but also straightforward. Well, maybe not always straightforward: they once designed a casino that looked like a pineapple. This project is not a fruit, and has a circulation path that spirals through the building, easily identifiable thanks to the corrugated glazing. If you can’t make it to Antwerp, because you’re snowed in or something, you can take a virutal tour here.

Alex